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Activity in prelimbic cortex is required for adjusting the anxiety response level during the elevated plus-maze retest.
Neuroscience. 2010 Sep 29; 170(1):214-22.N

Abstract

The prelimbic (PL) subregion of medial prefrontal cortex has been implicated in anxiety regulation. It is unknown, however, whether PL cortex also serves to fine-tuning the level of anxiety-related behavior exhibited on the next exposure to the same potentially threatening situation. To address this, we infused cobalt (1.0 mM) to temporarily inactivate the PL cortex during testing, post-testing or retesting in the elevated plus-maze (EPM). This protocol was chosen because it allowed us to concurrently investigate anxiety and the process of aversive learning and memory. PL cortex inactivation during the EPM testing increased the exploration of open-arms, substantiating its role in anxiety. PL cortex inactivation during the EPM retesting counteracted the further avoidance to open-arms exhibited by rats. Interestingly, as evidenced by min-by-min analysis, the cobalt-treated group behaved on EPM retesting as did the vehicle-treated group on EPM testing. This result may imply that activity in PL cortex is necessary for retrieving previously learned information that adjusts the anxiety response level on EPM retesting. Alternatively, a simple reduction in anxiety could explain the cobalt-induced increase in retest open-arms exploration. Neither test nor post-test PL cortex inactivation affected the further avoidance to open-arms observed on EPM retesting. To extend the investigation of PL cortex role in the regulation of open-arms avoidance, we infused other drugs prior to testing or retesting in the EPM. Antagonism of PL cortex adrenergic beta-1 receptors with atenolol (10 nmol), cholinergic muscarinic receptors with scopolamine (20 nmol) or glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors with AP5 (6.0 nmol) interfered with the level of open-arms exploration on testing, but not on retesting.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Farmacologia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC, 88049-900, Brazil.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20620194

Citation

Stern, C A J., et al. "Activity in Prelimbic Cortex Is Required for Adjusting the Anxiety Response Level During the Elevated Plus-maze Retest." Neuroscience, vol. 170, no. 1, 2010, pp. 214-22.
Stern CA, Do Monte FH, Gazarini L, et al. Activity in prelimbic cortex is required for adjusting the anxiety response level during the elevated plus-maze retest. Neuroscience. 2010;170(1):214-22.
Stern, C. A., Do Monte, F. H., Gazarini, L., Carobrez, A. P., & Bertoglio, L. J. (2010). Activity in prelimbic cortex is required for adjusting the anxiety response level during the elevated plus-maze retest. Neuroscience, 170(1), 214-22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2010.06.080
Stern CA, et al. Activity in Prelimbic Cortex Is Required for Adjusting the Anxiety Response Level During the Elevated Plus-maze Retest. Neuroscience. 2010 Sep 29;170(1):214-22. PubMed PMID: 20620194.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Activity in prelimbic cortex is required for adjusting the anxiety response level during the elevated plus-maze retest. AU - Stern,C A J, AU - Do Monte,F H M, AU - Gazarini,L, AU - Carobrez,A P, AU - Bertoglio,L J, Y1 - 2010/07/08/ PY - 2010/05/10/received PY - 2010/06/23/revised PY - 2010/06/29/accepted PY - 2010/7/13/entrez PY - 2010/7/14/pubmed PY - 2011/5/25/medline SP - 214 EP - 22 JF - Neuroscience JO - Neuroscience VL - 170 IS - 1 N2 - The prelimbic (PL) subregion of medial prefrontal cortex has been implicated in anxiety regulation. It is unknown, however, whether PL cortex also serves to fine-tuning the level of anxiety-related behavior exhibited on the next exposure to the same potentially threatening situation. To address this, we infused cobalt (1.0 mM) to temporarily inactivate the PL cortex during testing, post-testing or retesting in the elevated plus-maze (EPM). This protocol was chosen because it allowed us to concurrently investigate anxiety and the process of aversive learning and memory. PL cortex inactivation during the EPM testing increased the exploration of open-arms, substantiating its role in anxiety. PL cortex inactivation during the EPM retesting counteracted the further avoidance to open-arms exhibited by rats. Interestingly, as evidenced by min-by-min analysis, the cobalt-treated group behaved on EPM retesting as did the vehicle-treated group on EPM testing. This result may imply that activity in PL cortex is necessary for retrieving previously learned information that adjusts the anxiety response level on EPM retesting. Alternatively, a simple reduction in anxiety could explain the cobalt-induced increase in retest open-arms exploration. Neither test nor post-test PL cortex inactivation affected the further avoidance to open-arms observed on EPM retesting. To extend the investigation of PL cortex role in the regulation of open-arms avoidance, we infused other drugs prior to testing or retesting in the EPM. Antagonism of PL cortex adrenergic beta-1 receptors with atenolol (10 nmol), cholinergic muscarinic receptors with scopolamine (20 nmol) or glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors with AP5 (6.0 nmol) interfered with the level of open-arms exploration on testing, but not on retesting. SN - 1873-7544 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20620194/Activity_in_prelimbic_cortex_is_required_for_adjusting_the_anxiety_response_level_during_the_elevated_plus_maze_retest_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4522(10)00952-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -