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Patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein need priority treatment.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2010 Jul; 143(1):72-7.OH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the clinical factors predicting the significantly elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations, defined herein as hs-CRP > or = 3 mg/L, in adult males with untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS).

STUDY DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

SETTING

Tertiary referral center.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

Sixty-five consecutive male patients with newly diagnosed OSAS were enrolled to receive complete medical history review, physical examination, in-laboratory overnight polysomnography, and hs-CRP test. The patients had no current or history of cardiovascular disease. The patients had a mean age of 38.2 +/- 9.9 years, body mass index (BMI) of 27.4 +/- 3.5 kg/m(2), and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) of 11.3 +/- 4.6. The serum levels of hs-CRP were assessed using peripheral venous blood samples.

RESULTS

Twenty-three percent of the overall patients had significantly elevated serum levels of hs-CRP. The increase of hs-CRP correlated fairly with BMI, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), tonsil size, and ESS (r = 0.450, 0.398, 0.393, and 0.300, respectively; all P < or = 0.05) after adjustment for conventional coronary heart disease risk factors. However, only the AHI could predict for significantly elevated hs-CRP after stepwise multiple linear regression (R(2) = 0.251, P < 0.001).

CONCLUSION

Patients in this study with hs-CRP > or = 3 mg/L were more prevalent in the severe OSAS group. This observation suggests that the severe OSAS patients need to have their cardiovascular statuses evaluated by use of an hs-CRP screening test.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20620622

Citation

Lee, Li-Ang, et al. "Patients With Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Elevated High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein Need Priority Treatment." Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 143, no. 1, 2010, pp. 72-7.
Lee LA, Chen NH, Huang CG, et al. Patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein need priority treatment. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2010;143(1):72-7.
Lee, L. A., Chen, N. H., Huang, C. G., Lin, S. W., Fang, T. J., & Li, H. Y. (2010). Patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein need priority treatment. Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 143(1), 72-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.otohns.2010.04.001
Lee LA, et al. Patients With Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Elevated High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein Need Priority Treatment. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2010;143(1):72-7. PubMed PMID: 20620622.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein need priority treatment. AU - Lee,Li-Ang, AU - Chen,Ning-Hung, AU - Huang,Chung-Guei, AU - Lin,Shih-Wei, AU - Fang,Tuan-Jen, AU - Li,Hsueh-Yu, PY - 2009/12/07/received PY - 2010/03/16/revised PY - 2010/04/01/accepted PY - 2010/7/13/entrez PY - 2010/7/14/pubmed PY - 2010/8/13/medline SP - 72 EP - 7 JF - Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery JO - Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg VL - 143 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical factors predicting the significantly elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations, defined herein as hs-CRP > or = 3 mg/L, in adult males with untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Sixty-five consecutive male patients with newly diagnosed OSAS were enrolled to receive complete medical history review, physical examination, in-laboratory overnight polysomnography, and hs-CRP test. The patients had no current or history of cardiovascular disease. The patients had a mean age of 38.2 +/- 9.9 years, body mass index (BMI) of 27.4 +/- 3.5 kg/m(2), and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) of 11.3 +/- 4.6. The serum levels of hs-CRP were assessed using peripheral venous blood samples. RESULTS: Twenty-three percent of the overall patients had significantly elevated serum levels of hs-CRP. The increase of hs-CRP correlated fairly with BMI, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), tonsil size, and ESS (r = 0.450, 0.398, 0.393, and 0.300, respectively; all P < or = 0.05) after adjustment for conventional coronary heart disease risk factors. However, only the AHI could predict for significantly elevated hs-CRP after stepwise multiple linear regression (R(2) = 0.251, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Patients in this study with hs-CRP > or = 3 mg/L were more prevalent in the severe OSAS group. This observation suggests that the severe OSAS patients need to have their cardiovascular statuses evaluated by use of an hs-CRP screening test. SN - 1097-6817 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20620622/Patients_with_severe_obstructive_sleep_apnea_syndrome_and_elevated_high_sensitivity_C_reactive_protein_need_priority_treatment_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1016/j.otohns.2010.04.001?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -