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Validating the Type D personality construct in Chinese patients with coronary heart disease.
J Psychosom Res. 2010 Aug; 69(2):111-8.JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Type D personality predicts poor prognosis in coronary heart disease (CHD) but little is known about Type D in non-Western cultures. We examined the (a) validity of the Type D construct and its assessment with the DS14 scale in the Chinese culture, (b) prevalence of Type D, and (c) gender vs. Type D discrepancies in depression/anxiety, among Chinese patients with CHD.

METHOD

Patients with CHD (N=326) completed the Chinese version of the DS14. The NEO Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and Stress Symptom Checklist (SSC) were administered to subsamples to establish construct and discriminant validity. Administration of the DS14, HADS, and SSC was repeated at 1 month after hospital discharge in 66 patients, and stability of the DS14 was examined in another subsample of 100 patients.

RESULTS

The theoretical structure of the Type D construct in the Chinese culture was supported (chi(2)/df=2.89, root mean square error of approximation=0.08, normal fit index=0.91, non-normal fit index=0.91, comparative fit index=0.93). The Negative Affectivity (NA) and Social Inhibition (SI) subscales of the DS14 in the entire sample were internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha=0.89/0.81), measured stable traits (3-month test-retest ICC=0.76/0.74), and correlated significantly with the neuroticism (NA/neuroticism, r=0.78, P<.001) and extraversion subscales (SI/extraversion, r=-0.64, P<.001) of the NEO-FFI, respectively. The prevalence of Type D personality was 31%. Type D was not related to transient emotional states. However, Chinese patients with a Type D personality were at increased concurrent risk of anxiety (P=.002) and depression (P=.016).

CONCLUSION

Type D personality is a cross-culturally valid construct, is associated with an increased risk of anxiety and depression, and deserves prompt attention in estimating the prognostic risk of Chinese CHD patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. dyu@cuhk.edu.hkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20624509

Citation

Yu, Doris S F., et al. "Validating the Type D Personality Construct in Chinese Patients With Coronary Heart Disease." Journal of Psychosomatic Research, vol. 69, no. 2, 2010, pp. 111-8.
Yu DS, Thompson DR, Yu CM, et al. Validating the Type D personality construct in Chinese patients with coronary heart disease. J Psychosom Res. 2010;69(2):111-8.
Yu, D. S., Thompson, D. R., Yu, C. M., Pedersen, S. S., & Denollet, J. (2010). Validating the Type D personality construct in Chinese patients with coronary heart disease. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 69(2), 111-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2010.01.014
Yu DS, et al. Validating the Type D Personality Construct in Chinese Patients With Coronary Heart Disease. J Psychosom Res. 2010;69(2):111-8. PubMed PMID: 20624509.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Validating the Type D personality construct in Chinese patients with coronary heart disease. AU - Yu,Doris S F, AU - Thompson,David R, AU - Yu,Cheuk Man, AU - Pedersen,Susanne S, AU - Denollet,Johan, PY - 2009/05/06/received PY - 2009/12/24/revised PY - 2010/01/15/accepted PY - 2010/7/14/entrez PY - 2010/7/14/pubmed PY - 2010/10/30/medline SP - 111 EP - 8 JF - Journal of psychosomatic research JO - J Psychosom Res VL - 69 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Type D personality predicts poor prognosis in coronary heart disease (CHD) but little is known about Type D in non-Western cultures. We examined the (a) validity of the Type D construct and its assessment with the DS14 scale in the Chinese culture, (b) prevalence of Type D, and (c) gender vs. Type D discrepancies in depression/anxiety, among Chinese patients with CHD. METHOD: Patients with CHD (N=326) completed the Chinese version of the DS14. The NEO Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and Stress Symptom Checklist (SSC) were administered to subsamples to establish construct and discriminant validity. Administration of the DS14, HADS, and SSC was repeated at 1 month after hospital discharge in 66 patients, and stability of the DS14 was examined in another subsample of 100 patients. RESULTS: The theoretical structure of the Type D construct in the Chinese culture was supported (chi(2)/df=2.89, root mean square error of approximation=0.08, normal fit index=0.91, non-normal fit index=0.91, comparative fit index=0.93). The Negative Affectivity (NA) and Social Inhibition (SI) subscales of the DS14 in the entire sample were internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha=0.89/0.81), measured stable traits (3-month test-retest ICC=0.76/0.74), and correlated significantly with the neuroticism (NA/neuroticism, r=0.78, P<.001) and extraversion subscales (SI/extraversion, r=-0.64, P<.001) of the NEO-FFI, respectively. The prevalence of Type D personality was 31%. Type D was not related to transient emotional states. However, Chinese patients with a Type D personality were at increased concurrent risk of anxiety (P=.002) and depression (P=.016). CONCLUSION: Type D personality is a cross-culturally valid construct, is associated with an increased risk of anxiety and depression, and deserves prompt attention in estimating the prognostic risk of Chinese CHD patients. SN - 1879-1360 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20624509/Validating_the_Type_D_personality_construct_in_Chinese_patients_with_coronary_heart_disease_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -