Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

An intensive behavioral weight loss intervention and hot flushes in women.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Higher body mass index is associated with worse hot flushes during menopause but the effect of weight loss on flushing is unclear.

METHODS

Self-administered questionnaires were used to assess bothersome hot flushes in a 6-month randomized controlled trial of an intensive behavioral weight loss program (intervention) vs a structured health education program (control) in 338 women who were overweight or obese and had urinary incontinence. Weight, body mass index, abdominal circumference, physical activity, calorie intake, blood pressure, and physical and mental functioning were assessed at baseline and at 6 months. Repeated-measures proportional odds models examined intervention effects on bothersome hot flushes and potential mediating factors.

RESULTS

Approximately half of participants (n = 154) were at least slightly bothered by hot flushes at baseline. Among these women, the intervention was associated with greater improvement in bothersome flushes vs control (odds ratio [OR] for improvement by 1 Likert category, 2.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-4.21). Reductions in weight (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.08-1.61; per 5-kg decrease), body mass index (1.17; 1.05-1.30; per 1-point decrease), and abdominal circumference (1.32; 1.07-1.64; per 5-cm decrease) were each associated with improvement in flushing, but changes in physical activity, calorie intake, blood pressure, and physical and mental functioning were not related. The effect of the intervention on flushing was modestly diminished after adjustment for multiple potential mediators (OR, 1.92; 95% CI, 0.95-3.89).

CONCLUSION

Among women who were overweight or obese and had bothersome hot flushes, an intensive behavioral weight loss intervention resulted in improvement in flushing relative to control. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00091988.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA. ahuang@ucsfmed.org

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    Archives of internal medicine 170:13 2010 Jul 12 pg 1161-7

    MeSH

    Alabama
    Behavior Therapy
    Body Mass Index
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Hot Flashes
    Humans
    Incidence
    Menopause
    Middle Aged
    Obesity
    Overweight
    Rhode Island
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Treatment Outcome
    Weight Loss

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    20625026

    Citation

    Huang, Alison J., et al. "An Intensive Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention and Hot Flushes in Women." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 170, no. 13, 2010, pp. 1161-7.
    Huang AJ, Subak LL, Wing R, et al. An intensive behavioral weight loss intervention and hot flushes in women. Arch Intern Med. 2010;170(13):1161-7.
    Huang, A. J., Subak, L. L., Wing, R., West, D. S., Hernandez, A. L., Macer, J., & Grady, D. (2010). An intensive behavioral weight loss intervention and hot flushes in women. Archives of Internal Medicine, 170(13), pp. 1161-7. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2010.162.
    Huang AJ, et al. An Intensive Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention and Hot Flushes in Women. Arch Intern Med. 2010 Jul 12;170(13):1161-7. PubMed PMID: 20625026.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - An intensive behavioral weight loss intervention and hot flushes in women. AU - Huang,Alison J, AU - Subak,Leslee L, AU - Wing,Rena, AU - West,Delia Smith, AU - Hernandez,Alexandra L, AU - Macer,Judy, AU - Grady,Deborah, AU - ,, PY - 2010/7/14/entrez PY - 2010/7/14/pubmed PY - 2010/9/3/medline SP - 1161 EP - 7 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 170 IS - 13 N2 - BACKGROUND: Higher body mass index is associated with worse hot flushes during menopause but the effect of weight loss on flushing is unclear. METHODS: Self-administered questionnaires were used to assess bothersome hot flushes in a 6-month randomized controlled trial of an intensive behavioral weight loss program (intervention) vs a structured health education program (control) in 338 women who were overweight or obese and had urinary incontinence. Weight, body mass index, abdominal circumference, physical activity, calorie intake, blood pressure, and physical and mental functioning were assessed at baseline and at 6 months. Repeated-measures proportional odds models examined intervention effects on bothersome hot flushes and potential mediating factors. RESULTS: Approximately half of participants (n = 154) were at least slightly bothered by hot flushes at baseline. Among these women, the intervention was associated with greater improvement in bothersome flushes vs control (odds ratio [OR] for improvement by 1 Likert category, 2.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-4.21). Reductions in weight (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.08-1.61; per 5-kg decrease), body mass index (1.17; 1.05-1.30; per 1-point decrease), and abdominal circumference (1.32; 1.07-1.64; per 5-cm decrease) were each associated with improvement in flushing, but changes in physical activity, calorie intake, blood pressure, and physical and mental functioning were not related. The effect of the intervention on flushing was modestly diminished after adjustment for multiple potential mediators (OR, 1.92; 95% CI, 0.95-3.89). CONCLUSION: Among women who were overweight or obese and had bothersome hot flushes, an intensive behavioral weight loss intervention resulted in improvement in flushing relative to control. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00091988. SN - 1538-3679 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20625026/full_citation L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinternmed.2010.162 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -