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Serum vitamin D and the risk of Parkinson disease.
Arch Neurol 2010; 67(7):808-11AN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate whether serum vitamin D level predicts the risk of Parkinson disease.

DESIGN

Cohort study.

SETTING

The study was based on the Mini-Finland Health Survey, which was conducted from 1978 to 1980, with Parkinson disease occurrence follow-up through the end of 2007. During the 29-year follow-up period, 50 incident Parkinson disease cases occurred. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was determined from frozen samples stored at baseline. Estimates of the relationship between serum vitamin D concentration and Parkinson disease incidence were calculated using the Cox model.

PARTICIPANTS

Three thousand one hundred seventy-three men and women, aged 50 to 79 years and free of Parkinson disease at baseline. Main Outcome Measure Parkinson disease incidence.

RESULTS

Individuals with higher serum vitamin D concentrations showed a reduced risk of Parkinson disease. The relative risk between the highest and lowest quartiles was 0.33 (95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.80) after adjustment for sex, age, marital status, education, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activity, smoking, body mass index, and month of blood draw.

CONCLUSIONS

The results are consistent with the suggestion that high vitamin D status provides protection against Parkinson disease. It cannot, however, be excluded that the finding is due to residual confounding and further studies are thus needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. paul.knekt@thl.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20625085

Citation

Knekt, Paul, et al. "Serum Vitamin D and the Risk of Parkinson Disease." Archives of Neurology, vol. 67, no. 7, 2010, pp. 808-11.
Knekt P, Kilkkinen A, Rissanen H, et al. Serum vitamin D and the risk of Parkinson disease. Arch Neurol. 2010;67(7):808-11.
Knekt, P., Kilkkinen, A., Rissanen, H., Marniemi, J., Sääksjärvi, K., & Heliövaara, M. (2010). Serum vitamin D and the risk of Parkinson disease. Archives of Neurology, 67(7), pp. 808-11. doi:10.1001/archneurol.2010.120.
Knekt P, et al. Serum Vitamin D and the Risk of Parkinson Disease. Arch Neurol. 2010;67(7):808-11. PubMed PMID: 20625085.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum vitamin D and the risk of Parkinson disease. AU - Knekt,Paul, AU - Kilkkinen,Annamari, AU - Rissanen,Harri, AU - Marniemi,Jukka, AU - Sääksjärvi,Katri, AU - Heliövaara,Markku, PY - 2010/7/14/entrez PY - 2010/7/14/pubmed PY - 2010/8/7/medline SP - 808 EP - 11 JF - Archives of neurology JO - Arch. Neurol. VL - 67 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether serum vitamin D level predicts the risk of Parkinson disease. DESIGN: Cohort study. SETTING: The study was based on the Mini-Finland Health Survey, which was conducted from 1978 to 1980, with Parkinson disease occurrence follow-up through the end of 2007. During the 29-year follow-up period, 50 incident Parkinson disease cases occurred. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was determined from frozen samples stored at baseline. Estimates of the relationship between serum vitamin D concentration and Parkinson disease incidence were calculated using the Cox model. PARTICIPANTS: Three thousand one hundred seventy-three men and women, aged 50 to 79 years and free of Parkinson disease at baseline. Main Outcome Measure Parkinson disease incidence. RESULTS: Individuals with higher serum vitamin D concentrations showed a reduced risk of Parkinson disease. The relative risk between the highest and lowest quartiles was 0.33 (95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.80) after adjustment for sex, age, marital status, education, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activity, smoking, body mass index, and month of blood draw. CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with the suggestion that high vitamin D status provides protection against Parkinson disease. It cannot, however, be excluded that the finding is due to residual confounding and further studies are thus needed. SN - 1538-3687 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20625085/full_citation L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/10.1001/archneurol.2010.120 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -