Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Viability of bifidobacteria strains in yogurt with added oat beta-glucan and corn starch during cold storage.
J Food Sci. 2010 Jun; 75(5):C439-44.JF

Abstract

Probiotics must be consumed at a level of 10(7) CFU/mL for successful colonization of the gut. In yogurts containing beneficial cultures, the survival of probiotic strains can quickly decline below this critical concentration during cold storage. We hypothesized that beta-glucan would increase the viability of bifidobacteria strains in yogurt during cold storage. Yogurts were produced containing 0.44% beta-glucan (concentrated or freeze-dried) extracted from whole oat flour and/or 1.33% modified corn starch, and bifidobacteria (B. breve or B. longum) at a concentration of at least 10(9) CFU/mL. All yogurts were stored at 4 degrees C. Bifidobacteria and yogurt cultures, Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbureckii subsp. bulgaricus, were enumerated from undisturbed aliquots before fermentation, after fermentation, and once a week for 5 wk. S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus maintained a concentration of at least 10(8) CFU/mL in yogurts containing concentrated or freeze-dried beta-glucan regardless of starch addition, and in the control with no added beta-glucan or starch. Similarly, the probiotic, Bifidobacterium breve, survived above a therapeutic level in all treatments. The addition of beta-glucan prolonged the survival of Bifidobacterium longum at a concentration of at least 10(7) CFU/mL by up to 2 wk on average beyond the control. Further, the inclusion of concentrated beta-glucan in yogurt improved survival of B. longum above 10(7) CFU/mL by 1 wk longer than did freeze-dried beta-glucan. Study results suggest that beta-glucan has a protective effect on bifidobacteria in yogurt when stressed by low-temperature storage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept. of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Iowa State Univ., Ames, Iowa 50011, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20629865

Citation

Rosburg, Valerie, et al. "Viability of Bifidobacteria Strains in Yogurt With Added Oat Beta-glucan and Corn Starch During Cold Storage." Journal of Food Science, vol. 75, no. 5, 2010, pp. C439-44.
Rosburg V, Boylston T, White P. Viability of bifidobacteria strains in yogurt with added oat beta-glucan and corn starch during cold storage. J Food Sci. 2010;75(5):C439-44.
Rosburg, V., Boylston, T., & White, P. (2010). Viability of bifidobacteria strains in yogurt with added oat beta-glucan and corn starch during cold storage. Journal of Food Science, 75(5), C439-44. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2010.01620.x
Rosburg V, Boylston T, White P. Viability of Bifidobacteria Strains in Yogurt With Added Oat Beta-glucan and Corn Starch During Cold Storage. J Food Sci. 2010;75(5):C439-44. PubMed PMID: 20629865.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Viability of bifidobacteria strains in yogurt with added oat beta-glucan and corn starch during cold storage. AU - Rosburg,Valerie, AU - Boylston,Terri, AU - White,Pamela, PY - 2010/7/16/entrez PY - 2010/7/16/pubmed PY - 2010/10/21/medline SP - C439 EP - 44 JF - Journal of food science JO - J Food Sci VL - 75 IS - 5 N2 - Probiotics must be consumed at a level of 10(7) CFU/mL for successful colonization of the gut. In yogurts containing beneficial cultures, the survival of probiotic strains can quickly decline below this critical concentration during cold storage. We hypothesized that beta-glucan would increase the viability of bifidobacteria strains in yogurt during cold storage. Yogurts were produced containing 0.44% beta-glucan (concentrated or freeze-dried) extracted from whole oat flour and/or 1.33% modified corn starch, and bifidobacteria (B. breve or B. longum) at a concentration of at least 10(9) CFU/mL. All yogurts were stored at 4 degrees C. Bifidobacteria and yogurt cultures, Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbureckii subsp. bulgaricus, were enumerated from undisturbed aliquots before fermentation, after fermentation, and once a week for 5 wk. S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus maintained a concentration of at least 10(8) CFU/mL in yogurts containing concentrated or freeze-dried beta-glucan regardless of starch addition, and in the control with no added beta-glucan or starch. Similarly, the probiotic, Bifidobacterium breve, survived above a therapeutic level in all treatments. The addition of beta-glucan prolonged the survival of Bifidobacterium longum at a concentration of at least 10(7) CFU/mL by up to 2 wk on average beyond the control. Further, the inclusion of concentrated beta-glucan in yogurt improved survival of B. longum above 10(7) CFU/mL by 1 wk longer than did freeze-dried beta-glucan. Study results suggest that beta-glucan has a protective effect on bifidobacteria in yogurt when stressed by low-temperature storage. SN - 1750-3841 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20629865/Viability_of_bifidobacteria_strains_in_yogurt_with_added_oat_beta_glucan_and_corn_starch_during_cold_storage_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2010.01620.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -