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Thoracic disc disease and stenosis.
Radiol Clin North Am. 1991 Jul; 29(4):765-75.RC

Abstract

Disc herniation and stenosis in the thoracic spine are relatively uncommon compared with their occurrence in the cervical or lumbar spine. They are usually degenerative, although trauma may be an aggravating or initiating factor. The clinical presentation includes local and/or radicular pain with or without signs and symptoms of cord dysfunction. Radicular pain may be secondary to mechanical compression or vascular impingement. MR imaging is the best way to define the specific abnormality as well as the effect on the adjacent spinal cord. CT after myelography may be useful as well, especially in those patients in whom there is involvement of the posterior ligamentous and osseous structures of the thoracic spinal canal. MR imaging may finally reveal the true incidence of thoracic disc herniation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Radiology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Ohio.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2063004

Citation

Rosenbloom, S A.. "Thoracic Disc Disease and Stenosis." Radiologic Clinics of North America, vol. 29, no. 4, 1991, pp. 765-75.
Rosenbloom SA. Thoracic disc disease and stenosis. Radiol Clin North Am. 1991;29(4):765-75.
Rosenbloom, S. A. (1991). Thoracic disc disease and stenosis. Radiologic Clinics of North America, 29(4), 765-75.
Rosenbloom SA. Thoracic Disc Disease and Stenosis. Radiol Clin North Am. 1991;29(4):765-75. PubMed PMID: 2063004.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Thoracic disc disease and stenosis. A1 - Rosenbloom,S A, PY - 1991/7/1/pubmed PY - 1991/7/1/medline PY - 1991/7/1/entrez SP - 765 EP - 75 JF - Radiologic clinics of North America JO - Radiol. Clin. North Am. VL - 29 IS - 4 N2 - Disc herniation and stenosis in the thoracic spine are relatively uncommon compared with their occurrence in the cervical or lumbar spine. They are usually degenerative, although trauma may be an aggravating or initiating factor. The clinical presentation includes local and/or radicular pain with or without signs and symptoms of cord dysfunction. Radicular pain may be secondary to mechanical compression or vascular impingement. MR imaging is the best way to define the specific abnormality as well as the effect on the adjacent spinal cord. CT after myelography may be useful as well, especially in those patients in whom there is involvement of the posterior ligamentous and osseous structures of the thoracic spinal canal. MR imaging may finally reveal the true incidence of thoracic disc herniation. SN - 0033-8389 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2063004/Thoracic_disc_disease_and_stenosis_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/spinalstenosis.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -