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Intake of fish and n-3 fatty acids and future risk of metabolic syndrome.
J Am Diet Assoc 2010; 110(7):1018-26JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Whether or not fish and n-3 fatty acid intake is associated with the metabolic syndrome risk has not been carefully evaluated. This study investigated the effect of fish and n-3 fatty acid intake on the incidence of metabolic syndrome and on the individual risk factors for the syndrome.

METHODS

A population-based prospective cohort study included 3,504 male and female Koreans aged 40 to 69 years from the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study. At the beginning of follow-up, all individuals were free of metabolic syndrome and known cardiovascular disease. Each participant completed a food frequency questionnaire. Incident cases of metabolic syndrome were identified by biennial health examinations during a follow-up period between April 17, 2003, and November 17, 2006. Pooled logistic regression analysis was applied to obtain an odds ratio (OR) of metabolic syndrome with its 95% confidence interval (CI) for fish or n-3 fatty acid intake.

RESULTS

After controlling for potential cardiovascular risk factors, multivariate OR for metabolic syndrome was 0.43 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.83) for men who ate fish daily when compared with those eating fish less than once a week. Similarly, metabolic syndrome risk was halved for men in the top decile of n-3 fatty acid intake when compared with those in the bottom decile (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.99). In particular, fish intake was significantly associated with triglyceride level and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level among the metabolic syndrome components. For women, apparent associations were not observed between fish intake or n-3 fatty acid intake and metabolic syndrome risk.

CONCLUSIONS

In a prospective study, high consumption of fish and n-3 fatty acids was significantly associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome among men, but not among women. Whether or not encouraging fish intake can help prevent the development of metabolic syndrome warrants further studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Foods and Nutrition, College of Natural Sciences, Kookmin University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20630158

Citation

Baik, Inkyung, et al. "Intake of Fish and N-3 Fatty Acids and Future Risk of Metabolic Syndrome." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 110, no. 7, 2010, pp. 1018-26.
Baik I, Abbott RD, Curb JD, et al. Intake of fish and n-3 fatty acids and future risk of metabolic syndrome. J Am Diet Assoc. 2010;110(7):1018-26.
Baik, I., Abbott, R. D., Curb, J. D., & Shin, C. (2010). Intake of fish and n-3 fatty acids and future risk of metabolic syndrome. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 110(7), pp. 1018-26. doi:10.1016/j.jada.2010.04.013.
Baik I, et al. Intake of Fish and N-3 Fatty Acids and Future Risk of Metabolic Syndrome. J Am Diet Assoc. 2010;110(7):1018-26. PubMed PMID: 20630158.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intake of fish and n-3 fatty acids and future risk of metabolic syndrome. AU - Baik,Inkyung, AU - Abbott,Robert D, AU - Curb,J David, AU - Shin,Chol, PY - 2009/12/15/received PY - 2010/7/16/entrez PY - 2010/7/16/pubmed PY - 2010/7/28/medline SP - 1018 EP - 26 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 110 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Whether or not fish and n-3 fatty acid intake is associated with the metabolic syndrome risk has not been carefully evaluated. This study investigated the effect of fish and n-3 fatty acid intake on the incidence of metabolic syndrome and on the individual risk factors for the syndrome. METHODS: A population-based prospective cohort study included 3,504 male and female Koreans aged 40 to 69 years from the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study. At the beginning of follow-up, all individuals were free of metabolic syndrome and known cardiovascular disease. Each participant completed a food frequency questionnaire. Incident cases of metabolic syndrome were identified by biennial health examinations during a follow-up period between April 17, 2003, and November 17, 2006. Pooled logistic regression analysis was applied to obtain an odds ratio (OR) of metabolic syndrome with its 95% confidence interval (CI) for fish or n-3 fatty acid intake. RESULTS: After controlling for potential cardiovascular risk factors, multivariate OR for metabolic syndrome was 0.43 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.83) for men who ate fish daily when compared with those eating fish less than once a week. Similarly, metabolic syndrome risk was halved for men in the top decile of n-3 fatty acid intake when compared with those in the bottom decile (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.99). In particular, fish intake was significantly associated with triglyceride level and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level among the metabolic syndrome components. For women, apparent associations were not observed between fish intake or n-3 fatty acid intake and metabolic syndrome risk. CONCLUSIONS: In a prospective study, high consumption of fish and n-3 fatty acids was significantly associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome among men, but not among women. Whether or not encouraging fish intake can help prevent the development of metabolic syndrome warrants further studies. SN - 1878-3570 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20630158/Intake_of_fish_and_n_3_fatty_acids_and_future_risk_of_metabolic_syndrome_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(10)00394-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -