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Anti-hypersensitivity effects of Shu-jing-huo-xue-tang, a Chinese herbal medicine, in CCI-neuropathic rats.
J Ethnopharmacol. 2010 Sep 15; 131(2):464-70.JE

Abstract

AIM OF THE STUDY

Shu-jing-huo-xue-tang (SJHXT) (Japanese name: Sokei-kakketu-to), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine composed of 17 crude drugs, has been prescribed over hundreds of years for treatment of chronic pain syndromes. We evaluated if oral SJHXT could suppress neuropathic pain behaviors in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

(1) Rats received repeated oral SJHXT 0.5 or 1.0 g/kg once daily for 14 days starting 24 h after CCI surgery, while neuropathic manifestations were evaluated until day 20 post-CCI. (2) Other groups of rats received single oral SJHXT 1.0 g/kg on day 14 post-CCI. (3) Additional groups of rats received oral SJHXT 1.0 g/kg on day 14 post-CCI, concomitantly with intraperitoneal yohimbine 1 mg/kg or methysergide 5 mg/kg. Neuropathic manifestations, including mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, were evaluated with paw withdrawal responses to increasing mechanical pressure and radiant heat, respectively.

RESULTS

Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia developed by day 14 post-CCI. Repeated oral SJHXT for 14 days produced anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects that outlasted the period of drug administration. Single oral SJHXT on day 14 also produced significant anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects, which were inhibited by yohimbine, an alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist, but not by methysergide, a serotonin receptor antagonist.

CONCLUSIONS

Oral SJHXT produced anti-hypersensitivity effects by actions on alpha-2 adrenoreceptors in CCI-neuropathic rats, and chronic oral administration of SJHXT could produce the long-lasting anti-hypersensitivity effects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20633621

Citation

Shu, Haihua, et al. "Anti-hypersensitivity Effects of Shu-jing-huo-xue-tang, a Chinese Herbal Medicine, in CCI-neuropathic Rats." Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 131, no. 2, 2010, pp. 464-70.
Shu H, Arita H, Hayashida M, et al. Anti-hypersensitivity effects of Shu-jing-huo-xue-tang, a Chinese herbal medicine, in CCI-neuropathic rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 2010;131(2):464-70.
Shu, H., Arita, H., Hayashida, M., Zhang, L., An, K., Huang, W., & Hanaoka, K. (2010). Anti-hypersensitivity effects of Shu-jing-huo-xue-tang, a Chinese herbal medicine, in CCI-neuropathic rats. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 131(2), 464-70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2010.07.004
Shu H, et al. Anti-hypersensitivity Effects of Shu-jing-huo-xue-tang, a Chinese Herbal Medicine, in CCI-neuropathic Rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 2010 Sep 15;131(2):464-70. PubMed PMID: 20633621.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anti-hypersensitivity effects of Shu-jing-huo-xue-tang, a Chinese herbal medicine, in CCI-neuropathic rats. AU - Shu,Haihua, AU - Arita,Hideko, AU - Hayashida,Masakazu, AU - Zhang,Liang, AU - An,Ke, AU - Huang,Wenqi, AU - Hanaoka,Kazuo, Y1 - 2010/07/13/ PY - 2009/12/05/received PY - 2010/06/06/revised PY - 2010/07/06/accepted PY - 2010/7/17/entrez PY - 2010/7/17/pubmed PY - 2011/5/3/medline SP - 464 EP - 70 JF - Journal of ethnopharmacology JO - J Ethnopharmacol VL - 131 IS - 2 N2 - AIM OF THE STUDY: Shu-jing-huo-xue-tang (SJHXT) (Japanese name: Sokei-kakketu-to), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine composed of 17 crude drugs, has been prescribed over hundreds of years for treatment of chronic pain syndromes. We evaluated if oral SJHXT could suppress neuropathic pain behaviors in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. MATERIALS AND METHODS: (1) Rats received repeated oral SJHXT 0.5 or 1.0 g/kg once daily for 14 days starting 24 h after CCI surgery, while neuropathic manifestations were evaluated until day 20 post-CCI. (2) Other groups of rats received single oral SJHXT 1.0 g/kg on day 14 post-CCI. (3) Additional groups of rats received oral SJHXT 1.0 g/kg on day 14 post-CCI, concomitantly with intraperitoneal yohimbine 1 mg/kg or methysergide 5 mg/kg. Neuropathic manifestations, including mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, were evaluated with paw withdrawal responses to increasing mechanical pressure and radiant heat, respectively. RESULTS: Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia developed by day 14 post-CCI. Repeated oral SJHXT for 14 days produced anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects that outlasted the period of drug administration. Single oral SJHXT on day 14 also produced significant anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects, which were inhibited by yohimbine, an alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist, but not by methysergide, a serotonin receptor antagonist. CONCLUSIONS: Oral SJHXT produced anti-hypersensitivity effects by actions on alpha-2 adrenoreceptors in CCI-neuropathic rats, and chronic oral administration of SJHXT could produce the long-lasting anti-hypersensitivity effects. SN - 1872-7573 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20633621/Anti_hypersensitivity_effects_of_Shu_jing_huo_xue_tang_a_Chinese_herbal_medicine_in_CCI_neuropathic_rats_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-8741(10)00465-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -