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Imported malaria in children: a comparative study between recent immigrants and immigrant travelers (VFRs).
J Travel Med. 2010 Jul-Aug; 17(4):221-7.JT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In Europe, imported malarial cases occur in returning travelers and immigrants mostly from African countries. There have been an increasing number of cases in the past years in Spain.

METHODS

An analysis of all cases of malaria who attended at the Hospital of Mostoles in the Southwest of Madrid from 1995 to 2007 was performed. Clinical, epidemiological, laboratory, and parasitological findings were analyzed and compared between immigrants coming from endemic countries (recent immigrants) and children who traveled to endemic areas to visit friends and relatives (VFRs).

RESULTS

Sixty cases of imported malaria were detected. Most of the cases (59 of 60) were acquired in sub-Saharan Africa. The most common species was Plasmodium falciparum (43 of 60). Microscopic examination was positive in 95%, and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Plasmodium achieved additional diagnosis in seven cases. Fourteen cases were VFRs; none of them used appropriate malaria chemoprophylaxis. Fever and thrombocytopenia were significantly more common among VFRs. They also had significantly higher parasite density. Twelve cases were asymptomatic at the time of diagnosis; all of them were recent immigrants.

CONCLUSIONS

VFRs account for a significant number of childhood malarial cases. These patients had not taken malaria chemoprophylaxis and malarial cases were more severe. VFR children are a high-risk group, and pretravel advice should underline the risk for malaria. Recent immigrants can be asymptomatic and parasitemias are lower. Therefore, a high index of suspicion is necessary, and PCR for Plasmodium should be performed in case of negative thick smears.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Mostoles Hospital, Madrid, Spain. jusoru@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20636594

Citation

Arnáez, Juan, et al. "Imported Malaria in Children: a Comparative Study Between Recent Immigrants and Immigrant Travelers (VFRs)." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 17, no. 4, 2010, pp. 221-7.
Arnáez J, Roa MA, Albert L, et al. Imported malaria in children: a comparative study between recent immigrants and immigrant travelers (VFRs). J Travel Med. 2010;17(4):221-7.
Arnáez, J., Roa, M. A., Albert, L., Cogollos, R., Rubio, J. M., Villares, R., Alarabe, A., Cervera, A., & López-Vélez, R. (2010). Imported malaria in children: a comparative study between recent immigrants and immigrant travelers (VFRs). Journal of Travel Medicine, 17(4), 221-7. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1708-8305.2010.00416.x
Arnáez J, et al. Imported Malaria in Children: a Comparative Study Between Recent Immigrants and Immigrant Travelers (VFRs). J Travel Med. 2010 Jul-Aug;17(4):221-7. PubMed PMID: 20636594.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Imported malaria in children: a comparative study between recent immigrants and immigrant travelers (VFRs). AU - Arnáez,Juan, AU - Roa,Miguel A, AU - Albert,Leticia, AU - Cogollos,Rosario, AU - Rubio,Jose M, AU - Villares,Rebeca, AU - Alarabe,Abdulkareem, AU - Cervera,Aurea, AU - López-Vélez,Rogelio, PY - 2010/7/20/entrez PY - 2010/7/20/pubmed PY - 2010/10/30/medline SP - 221 EP - 7 JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 17 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: In Europe, imported malarial cases occur in returning travelers and immigrants mostly from African countries. There have been an increasing number of cases in the past years in Spain. METHODS: An analysis of all cases of malaria who attended at the Hospital of Mostoles in the Southwest of Madrid from 1995 to 2007 was performed. Clinical, epidemiological, laboratory, and parasitological findings were analyzed and compared between immigrants coming from endemic countries (recent immigrants) and children who traveled to endemic areas to visit friends and relatives (VFRs). RESULTS: Sixty cases of imported malaria were detected. Most of the cases (59 of 60) were acquired in sub-Saharan Africa. The most common species was Plasmodium falciparum (43 of 60). Microscopic examination was positive in 95%, and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Plasmodium achieved additional diagnosis in seven cases. Fourteen cases were VFRs; none of them used appropriate malaria chemoprophylaxis. Fever and thrombocytopenia were significantly more common among VFRs. They also had significantly higher parasite density. Twelve cases were asymptomatic at the time of diagnosis; all of them were recent immigrants. CONCLUSIONS: VFRs account for a significant number of childhood malarial cases. These patients had not taken malaria chemoprophylaxis and malarial cases were more severe. VFR children are a high-risk group, and pretravel advice should underline the risk for malaria. Recent immigrants can be asymptomatic and parasitemias are lower. Therefore, a high index of suspicion is necessary, and PCR for Plasmodium should be performed in case of negative thick smears. SN - 1708-8305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20636594/Imported_malaria_in_children:_a_comparative_study_between_recent_immigrants_and_immigrant_travelers__VFRs__ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/j.1708-8305.2010.00416.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -