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Epidemiology of postconcussion syndrome in pediatric mild traumatic brain injury.
Pediatrics. 2010 Aug; 126(2):e374-81.Ped

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Much disagreement exists as to whether postconcussion syndrome (PCS) is attributable to brain injury or to other factors such as trauma alone, preexisting psychosocial problems, or medicolegal issues. We investigated the epidemiology and natural history of PCS symptoms in a large cohort of children with a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and compared them with children with an extracranial injury (ECI).

METHODS

This investigation was a prospective, consecutive controlled-cohort study of 670 children who presented to a tertiary referral emergency department with mTBI and 197 children who presented with ECI. For all participants, data were collected by use of a telephone interview of a parent 7 to 10 days after injury. If a change from preinjury symptoms was reported by a parent, follow-up continued monthly until symptom resolution. Outcomes were measured by using the Post Concussion Symptom Inventory, Rivermead Postconcussion Symptom Questionnaire, Brief Symptom Inventory, and Family Assessment Device.

RESULTS

There was a significant difference between the mTBI and ECI groups in their survival curves for time to symptom resolution (log rank [Mantel-Cox] 11.15, P < .001). Three months after injury, 11% of the children in the mTBI group were symptomatic (13.7% of children older than 6 years) compared with 0.5% of the children in the ECI group. The prevalence of persistent symptoms at 1 year was 2.3% in the mTBI group and 0.01% in the ECI group. Family functioning and maternal adjustment did not differ between groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Among school-aged children with mTBI, 13.7% were symptomatic 3 months after injury. This finding could not be explained by trauma, family dysfunction, or maternal psychological adjustment. The results of this study provide clear support for the validity of the diagnosis of PCS in children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. karen.barlow@albertahealthservices.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20660554

Citation

Barlow, Karen Maria, et al. "Epidemiology of Postconcussion Syndrome in Pediatric Mild Traumatic Brain Injury." Pediatrics, vol. 126, no. 2, 2010, pp. e374-81.
Barlow KM, Crawford S, Stevenson A, et al. Epidemiology of postconcussion syndrome in pediatric mild traumatic brain injury. Pediatrics. 2010;126(2):e374-81.
Barlow, K. M., Crawford, S., Stevenson, A., Sandhu, S. S., Belanger, F., & Dewey, D. (2010). Epidemiology of postconcussion syndrome in pediatric mild traumatic brain injury. Pediatrics, 126(2), e374-81. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2009-0925
Barlow KM, et al. Epidemiology of Postconcussion Syndrome in Pediatric Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Pediatrics. 2010;126(2):e374-81. PubMed PMID: 20660554.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of postconcussion syndrome in pediatric mild traumatic brain injury. AU - Barlow,Karen Maria, AU - Crawford,Susan, AU - Stevenson,Andrea, AU - Sandhu,Sandeep Sona, AU - Belanger,François, AU - Dewey,Deborah, Y1 - 2010/07/26/ PY - 2010/7/28/entrez PY - 2010/7/28/pubmed PY - 2010/9/3/medline SP - e374 EP - 81 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 126 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Much disagreement exists as to whether postconcussion syndrome (PCS) is attributable to brain injury or to other factors such as trauma alone, preexisting psychosocial problems, or medicolegal issues. We investigated the epidemiology and natural history of PCS symptoms in a large cohort of children with a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and compared them with children with an extracranial injury (ECI). METHODS: This investigation was a prospective, consecutive controlled-cohort study of 670 children who presented to a tertiary referral emergency department with mTBI and 197 children who presented with ECI. For all participants, data were collected by use of a telephone interview of a parent 7 to 10 days after injury. If a change from preinjury symptoms was reported by a parent, follow-up continued monthly until symptom resolution. Outcomes were measured by using the Post Concussion Symptom Inventory, Rivermead Postconcussion Symptom Questionnaire, Brief Symptom Inventory, and Family Assessment Device. RESULTS: There was a significant difference between the mTBI and ECI groups in their survival curves for time to symptom resolution (log rank [Mantel-Cox] 11.15, P < .001). Three months after injury, 11% of the children in the mTBI group were symptomatic (13.7% of children older than 6 years) compared with 0.5% of the children in the ECI group. The prevalence of persistent symptoms at 1 year was 2.3% in the mTBI group and 0.01% in the ECI group. Family functioning and maternal adjustment did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Among school-aged children with mTBI, 13.7% were symptomatic 3 months after injury. This finding could not be explained by trauma, family dysfunction, or maternal psychological adjustment. The results of this study provide clear support for the validity of the diagnosis of PCS in children. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20660554/Epidemiology_of_postconcussion_syndrome_in_pediatric_mild_traumatic_brain_injury_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=20660554 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -