Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Red meat and colorectal cancer: a critical summary of prospective epidemiologic studies.
Obes Rev 2011; 12(5):e472-93OR

Abstract

Meat consumption and cancer has been evaluated in hundreds of epidemiologic studies over the past three decades; however, the possible role of this food group on carcinogenesis is equivocal. In this comprehensive review, the currently available epidemiologic prospective studies of red meat intake and colorectal cancer are summarized to provide a greater understanding of any potential relationships. Specifically, salient demographic, methodological and analytical information is synthesized across 35 prospective studies. Collectively, associations between red meat consumption and colorectal cancer are generally weak in magnitude, with most relative risks below 1.50 and not statistically significant, and there is a lack of a clear dose-response trend. Results are variable by anatomic tumour site (colon vs. rectum) and by gender, as the epidemiologic data are not indicative of a positive association among women while most associations are weakly elevated among men. Colinearity between red meat intake and other dietary factors (e.g. Western lifestyle, high intake of refined sugars and alcohol, low intake of fruits, vegetables and fibre) and behavioural factors (e.g. low physical activity, high smoking prevalence, high body mass index) limit the ability to analytically isolate the independent effects of red meat consumption. Because of these factors, the currently available epidemiologic evidence is not sufficient to support an independent positive association between red meat consumption and colorectal cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Exponent Inc. Health Sciences, Wood Dale, IL, USA. dalexander@exponent.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20663065

Citation

Alexander, D D., and C A. Cushing. "Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer: a Critical Summary of Prospective Epidemiologic Studies." Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 12, no. 5, 2011, pp. e472-93.
Alexander DD, Cushing CA. Red meat and colorectal cancer: a critical summary of prospective epidemiologic studies. Obes Rev. 2011;12(5):e472-93.
Alexander, D. D., & Cushing, C. A. (2011). Red meat and colorectal cancer: a critical summary of prospective epidemiologic studies. Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 12(5), pp. e472-93. doi:10.1111/j.1467-789X.2010.00785.x.
Alexander DD, Cushing CA. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer: a Critical Summary of Prospective Epidemiologic Studies. Obes Rev. 2011;12(5):e472-93. PubMed PMID: 20663065.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Red meat and colorectal cancer: a critical summary of prospective epidemiologic studies. AU - Alexander,D D, AU - Cushing,C A, PY - 2010/7/29/entrez PY - 2010/7/29/pubmed PY - 2011/5/13/medline SP - e472 EP - 93 JF - Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity JO - Obes Rev VL - 12 IS - 5 N2 - Meat consumption and cancer has been evaluated in hundreds of epidemiologic studies over the past three decades; however, the possible role of this food group on carcinogenesis is equivocal. In this comprehensive review, the currently available epidemiologic prospective studies of red meat intake and colorectal cancer are summarized to provide a greater understanding of any potential relationships. Specifically, salient demographic, methodological and analytical information is synthesized across 35 prospective studies. Collectively, associations between red meat consumption and colorectal cancer are generally weak in magnitude, with most relative risks below 1.50 and not statistically significant, and there is a lack of a clear dose-response trend. Results are variable by anatomic tumour site (colon vs. rectum) and by gender, as the epidemiologic data are not indicative of a positive association among women while most associations are weakly elevated among men. Colinearity between red meat intake and other dietary factors (e.g. Western lifestyle, high intake of refined sugars and alcohol, low intake of fruits, vegetables and fibre) and behavioural factors (e.g. low physical activity, high smoking prevalence, high body mass index) limit the ability to analytically isolate the independent effects of red meat consumption. Because of these factors, the currently available epidemiologic evidence is not sufficient to support an independent positive association between red meat consumption and colorectal cancer. SN - 1467-789X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20663065/Red_meat_and_colorectal_cancer:_a_critical_summary_of_prospective_epidemiologic_studies_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-789X.2010.00785.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -