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Major depression is associated with impaired processing of emotion in music as well as in facial and vocal stimuli.
J Affect Disord. 2011 Feb; 128(3):243-51.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The processing of emotional stimuli is thought to be negatively biased in major depression. This study investigates this issue using musical, vocal and facial affective stimuli.

METHODS

23 depressed in-patients and 23 matched healthy controls were recruited. Affective information processing was assessed through musical, vocal and facial emotion recognition tasks. Depression, anxiety level and attention capacity were controlled.

RESULTS

The depressed participants demonstrated less accurate identification of emotions than the control group in all three sorts of emotion-recognition tasks. The depressed group also gave higher intensity ratings than the controls when scoring negative emotions, and they were more likely to attribute negative emotions to neutral voices and faces.

LIMITATIONS

Our in-patient group might differ from the more general population of depressed adults. They were all taking anti-depressant medication, which may have had an influence on their emotional information processing.

CONCLUSIONS

Major depression is associated with a general negative bias in the processing of emotional stimuli. Emotional processing impairment in depression is not confined to interpersonal stimuli (faces and voices), being also present in the ability to feel music accurately.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratoire de Psychologie Médicale, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20663569

Citation

Naranjo, C, et al. "Major Depression Is Associated With Impaired Processing of Emotion in Music as Well as in Facial and Vocal Stimuli." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 128, no. 3, 2011, pp. 243-51.
Naranjo C, Kornreich C, Campanella S, et al. Major depression is associated with impaired processing of emotion in music as well as in facial and vocal stimuli. J Affect Disord. 2011;128(3):243-51.
Naranjo, C., Kornreich, C., Campanella, S., Noël, X., Vandriette, Y., Gillain, B., de Longueville, X., Delatte, B., Verbanck, P., & Constant, E. (2011). Major depression is associated with impaired processing of emotion in music as well as in facial and vocal stimuli. Journal of Affective Disorders, 128(3), 243-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2010.06.039
Naranjo C, et al. Major Depression Is Associated With Impaired Processing of Emotion in Music as Well as in Facial and Vocal Stimuli. J Affect Disord. 2011;128(3):243-51. PubMed PMID: 20663569.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Major depression is associated with impaired processing of emotion in music as well as in facial and vocal stimuli. AU - Naranjo,C, AU - Kornreich,C, AU - Campanella,S, AU - Noël,X, AU - Vandriette,Y, AU - Gillain,B, AU - de Longueville,X, AU - Delatte,B, AU - Verbanck,P, AU - Constant,E, PY - 2010/03/23/received PY - 2010/06/28/revised PY - 2010/06/29/accepted PY - 2010/7/29/entrez PY - 2010/7/29/pubmed PY - 2011/4/26/medline SP - 243 EP - 51 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 128 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The processing of emotional stimuli is thought to be negatively biased in major depression. This study investigates this issue using musical, vocal and facial affective stimuli. METHODS: 23 depressed in-patients and 23 matched healthy controls were recruited. Affective information processing was assessed through musical, vocal and facial emotion recognition tasks. Depression, anxiety level and attention capacity were controlled. RESULTS: The depressed participants demonstrated less accurate identification of emotions than the control group in all three sorts of emotion-recognition tasks. The depressed group also gave higher intensity ratings than the controls when scoring negative emotions, and they were more likely to attribute negative emotions to neutral voices and faces. LIMITATIONS: Our in-patient group might differ from the more general population of depressed adults. They were all taking anti-depressant medication, which may have had an influence on their emotional information processing. CONCLUSIONS: Major depression is associated with a general negative bias in the processing of emotional stimuli. Emotional processing impairment in depression is not confined to interpersonal stimuli (faces and voices), being also present in the ability to feel music accurately. SN - 1573-2517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20663569/Major_depression_is_associated_with_impaired_processing_of_emotion_in_music_as_well_as_in_facial_and_vocal_stimuli_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(10)00467-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -