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[Is prediction of the allergic march possible on the basis of nasal cytology?].
Pneumonol Alergol Pol. 2010; 78(4):263-70.PA

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The term allergic march has been used to describe natural evolution of the atopic disease in children, accompanied by the change in organ manifestation with time. The aim of the study was to analyze the role of the cellular components of the nasal cytology as a tool for prediction of atopic diseases and clinical symptoms preceding allergic march.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

In a retrospective manner out of a group of 1620 children, 146 symptomatic children (60 girls and 86 boys) meeting inclusion criteria (age below 4 years at first visit, symptoms suggesting allergy, nasal cytology performed at the beginning of observation, observation of at least 4 years) were included in analysis.

RESULTS

Mean age of children at time of enrollment was 27 months (SD 10 months). After 4 years allergic rhinitis (AR) was diagnosed in 85 children (58.2%), atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (AEDS) in 51 (34.9%) and asthma in 48 (32.9%). Nonallergic etiology was identified in 36 patients (22.5%). All patients with asthma suffered from AR. Significant differences between groups were found in number of eosinophils (p < 0.001), neutrophils (p < 0.001), and lymphocytes (p = 0.028) in cytological examination of nasal mucosa. In children with AR (alone or combined with other comorbidities) nasal eosinophilia was higher than in children with AEDS (18% v. 3%; p = 0.004) or non-allergic disease (18% v. 4%; p < 0.001). Nasal eosinophilia of at least 8% was predictive for development of AR (sensitivity 80%, specificity 95%).

CONCLUSIONS

In children below 4 years nasal eosinophilia >or= 8% was predictive for AR development. Allergic march was observed in children with AEDS or/and gastrointestinal allergy symptoms present at the beginning of observation. Nasal eosinophilia in small children might be predictive for the risk of allergic march.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Gabinet Alergologiczno-Pediatryczny, ul. Masarska 7/II, 31-534 Kraków. kiwer@oswirus.krakow.plNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

pol

PubMed ID

20665446

Citation

Nowacki, Zygmunt, et al. "[Is Prediction of the Allergic March Possible On the Basis of Nasal Cytology?]." Pneumonologia I Alergologia Polska, vol. 78, no. 4, 2010, pp. 263-70.
Nowacki Z, Neuberg J, Strzałka K, et al. [Is prediction of the allergic march possible on the basis of nasal cytology?]. Pneumonol Alergol Pol. 2010;78(4):263-70.
Nowacki, Z., Neuberg, J., Strzałka, K., Szczepanik, M., Szczepanik, R., & Mazurek, H. (2010). [Is prediction of the allergic march possible on the basis of nasal cytology?]. Pneumonologia I Alergologia Polska, 78(4), 263-70.
Nowacki Z, et al. [Is Prediction of the Allergic March Possible On the Basis of Nasal Cytology?]. Pneumonol Alergol Pol. 2010;78(4):263-70. PubMed PMID: 20665446.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Is prediction of the allergic march possible on the basis of nasal cytology?]. AU - Nowacki,Zygmunt, AU - Neuberg,Jolanta, AU - Strzałka,Krystyna, AU - Szczepanik,Magdalena, AU - Szczepanik,Renata, AU - Mazurek,Henryk, PY - 2010/7/29/entrez PY - 2010/7/29/pubmed PY - 2010/8/21/medline SP - 263 EP - 70 JF - Pneumonologia i alergologia polska JO - Pneumonol Alergol Pol VL - 78 IS - 4 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The term allergic march has been used to describe natural evolution of the atopic disease in children, accompanied by the change in organ manifestation with time. The aim of the study was to analyze the role of the cellular components of the nasal cytology as a tool for prediction of atopic diseases and clinical symptoms preceding allergic march. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a retrospective manner out of a group of 1620 children, 146 symptomatic children (60 girls and 86 boys) meeting inclusion criteria (age below 4 years at first visit, symptoms suggesting allergy, nasal cytology performed at the beginning of observation, observation of at least 4 years) were included in analysis. RESULTS: Mean age of children at time of enrollment was 27 months (SD 10 months). After 4 years allergic rhinitis (AR) was diagnosed in 85 children (58.2%), atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (AEDS) in 51 (34.9%) and asthma in 48 (32.9%). Nonallergic etiology was identified in 36 patients (22.5%). All patients with asthma suffered from AR. Significant differences between groups were found in number of eosinophils (p < 0.001), neutrophils (p < 0.001), and lymphocytes (p = 0.028) in cytological examination of nasal mucosa. In children with AR (alone or combined with other comorbidities) nasal eosinophilia was higher than in children with AEDS (18% v. 3%; p = 0.004) or non-allergic disease (18% v. 4%; p < 0.001). Nasal eosinophilia of at least 8% was predictive for development of AR (sensitivity 80%, specificity 95%). CONCLUSIONS: In children below 4 years nasal eosinophilia >or= 8% was predictive for AR development. Allergic march was observed in children with AEDS or/and gastrointestinal allergy symptoms present at the beginning of observation. Nasal eosinophilia in small children might be predictive for the risk of allergic march. SN - 0867-7077 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20665446/[Is_prediction_of_the_allergic_march_possible_on_the_basis_of_nasal_cytology]_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -