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Challenging traditional premedical requirements as predictors of success in medical school: the Mount Sinai School of Medicine Humanities and Medicine Program.
Acad Med. 2010 Aug; 85(8):1378-83.AM

Abstract

PURPOSE

Students compete aggressively as they prepare for the MCAT and fulfill traditional premedical requirements that have uncertain educational value for medical and scientific careers and limit the scope of their liberal arts and biomedical education. This study assessed the medical school performance of humanities and social science majors who omitted organic chemistry, physics, and calculus, and did not take the MCAT.

METHOD

The authors compared and contrasted the academic outcomes of 85 Humanities and Medicine Program (HuMed) students at Mount Sinai School of Medicine with those of their 606 traditionally prepared classmates for the 2004-2009 graduating classes. The authors analyzed basic science knowledge, clerkship performance, humanism, leadership, community service, research fellowships, distinctions, and honors.

RESULTS

There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in clerkship honors other than psychiatry (HuMed students outperformed their peers, P < .0001) or in commencement distinctions or honors. Although HuMed students were significantly more likely to secure a scholarly-year mentored project (P = .001), there was no difference in graduating with distinction in research (P = .281). HuMed students were more likely to have lower United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 scores (221 +/- 20 versus 227 +/- 19, P = .0039) and to take a nonscholarly leave of absence (P = .0001). There was a trend among HuMed students toward residencies in primary care and psychiatry and away from surgical subspecialties and anesthesiology.

CONCLUSIONS

Students without the traditional premedical preparation performed at a level equivalent to their premedical classmates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Education, Mount Sinai School of Medicine of New York University, New York, NY, USA. david.muller@mssm.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20671464

Citation

Muller, David, and Nathan Kase. "Challenging Traditional Premedical Requirements as Predictors of Success in Medical School: the Mount Sinai School of Medicine Humanities and Medicine Program." Academic Medicine : Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, vol. 85, no. 8, 2010, pp. 1378-83.
Muller D, Kase N. Challenging traditional premedical requirements as predictors of success in medical school: the Mount Sinai School of Medicine Humanities and Medicine Program. Acad Med. 2010;85(8):1378-83.
Muller, D., & Kase, N. (2010). Challenging traditional premedical requirements as predictors of success in medical school: the Mount Sinai School of Medicine Humanities and Medicine Program. Academic Medicine : Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, 85(8), 1378-83. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181dbf22a
Muller D, Kase N. Challenging Traditional Premedical Requirements as Predictors of Success in Medical School: the Mount Sinai School of Medicine Humanities and Medicine Program. Acad Med. 2010;85(8):1378-83. PubMed PMID: 20671464.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Challenging traditional premedical requirements as predictors of success in medical school: the Mount Sinai School of Medicine Humanities and Medicine Program. AU - Muller,David, AU - Kase,Nathan, PY - 2010/7/31/entrez PY - 2010/7/31/pubmed PY - 2010/9/23/medline SP - 1378 EP - 83 JF - Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges JO - Acad Med VL - 85 IS - 8 N2 - PURPOSE: Students compete aggressively as they prepare for the MCAT and fulfill traditional premedical requirements that have uncertain educational value for medical and scientific careers and limit the scope of their liberal arts and biomedical education. This study assessed the medical school performance of humanities and social science majors who omitted organic chemistry, physics, and calculus, and did not take the MCAT. METHOD: The authors compared and contrasted the academic outcomes of 85 Humanities and Medicine Program (HuMed) students at Mount Sinai School of Medicine with those of their 606 traditionally prepared classmates for the 2004-2009 graduating classes. The authors analyzed basic science knowledge, clerkship performance, humanism, leadership, community service, research fellowships, distinctions, and honors. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in clerkship honors other than psychiatry (HuMed students outperformed their peers, P < .0001) or in commencement distinctions or honors. Although HuMed students were significantly more likely to secure a scholarly-year mentored project (P = .001), there was no difference in graduating with distinction in research (P = .281). HuMed students were more likely to have lower United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 scores (221 +/- 20 versus 227 +/- 19, P = .0039) and to take a nonscholarly leave of absence (P = .0001). There was a trend among HuMed students toward residencies in primary care and psychiatry and away from surgical subspecialties and anesthesiology. CONCLUSIONS: Students without the traditional premedical preparation performed at a level equivalent to their premedical classmates. SN - 1938-808X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20671464/Challenging_traditional_premedical_requirements_as_predictors_of_success_in_medical_school:_the_Mount_Sinai_School_of_Medicine_Humanities_and_Medicine_Program_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181dbf22a DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -