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Comparative effectiveness research: a progress report.
Ann Intern Med. 2010 Oct 05; 153(7):469-72.AIM

Abstract

Sixteen months ago, comparative effectiveness research (CER) began its rapid rise, when the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 allocated $1.1 billion for CER. This progress report summarizes how the recipients of the funds-the National Institutes of Health, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and Office of the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services-are spending the $1.1 billion, how the Institute of Medicine priority topics have fared in the agencies' funding programs, and the developing plans for a national CER program. As the United States works to absorb 32 million currently uninsured people into the health care system while simultaneously improving the quality of care and slowing cost increases, CER will increasingly be a necessary component of this change.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. hsox@comcast.net

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20679544

Citation

Sox, Harold C.. "Comparative Effectiveness Research: a Progress Report." Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 153, no. 7, 2010, pp. 469-72.
Sox HC. Comparative effectiveness research: a progress report. Ann Intern Med. 2010;153(7):469-72.
Sox, H. C. (2010). Comparative effectiveness research: a progress report. Annals of Internal Medicine, 153(7), 469-72. https://doi.org/10.7326/0003-4819-153-7-201010050-00269
Sox HC. Comparative Effectiveness Research: a Progress Report. Ann Intern Med. 2010 Oct 5;153(7):469-72. PubMed PMID: 20679544.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparative effectiveness research: a progress report. A1 - Sox,Harold C, Y1 - 2010/08/02/ PY - 2010/8/4/entrez PY - 2010/8/4/pubmed PY - 2010/11/17/medline SP - 469 EP - 72 JF - Annals of internal medicine JO - Ann Intern Med VL - 153 IS - 7 N2 - Sixteen months ago, comparative effectiveness research (CER) began its rapid rise, when the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 allocated $1.1 billion for CER. This progress report summarizes how the recipients of the funds-the National Institutes of Health, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and Office of the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services-are spending the $1.1 billion, how the Institute of Medicine priority topics have fared in the agencies' funding programs, and the developing plans for a national CER program. As the United States works to absorb 32 million currently uninsured people into the health care system while simultaneously improving the quality of care and slowing cost increases, CER will increasingly be a necessary component of this change. SN - 1539-3704 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20679544/Comparative_effectiveness_research:_a_progress_report_ L2 - https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/0003-4819-153-7-201010050-00269?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -