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Postconcussive symptoms after blast and nonblast-related mild traumatic brain injuries in Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans.
J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2010 Sep; 16(5):856-66.JI

Abstract

Blast injury is common in current warfare, but little is known about the effects of blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Profile analyses were conducted investigating differences in self-reported postconcussive (PC) symptoms in 339 veteran outpatients with mTBI histories reporting current symptoms based on mechanism of injury (blast only, nonblast only, or both blast and nonblast), number of blast injuries, and distance from the blast. Veterans with any blast-related mTBI history were younger and reported higher posttraumatic stress symptoms than veterans with nonblast-related mTBI histories, with a marginally significant difference in posttraumatic stress symptom report between veterans reporting blast-related mTBI only and those reporting nonblast-related mTBI. The groups did not differ in terms of PC symptom severity or PC symptom cluster profiles. Among veterans with blast-related mTBI histories, PC symptom report did not vary by number of blast-related mTBIs or proximity to blast. Overall, posttraumatic stress symptoms accounted for a substantial portion of variance in PC symptom report. In veteran outpatients with remote mTBI histories who have enduring symptom complaints related to the mTBI, mechanism of injury did not clearly contribute to differential PC symptom severity or PC symptom cluster profile. Proximal rather than distal factors may be important intervention targets in returning symptomatic veterans with mTBI histories.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rehabilitation Care Line, Michael E. DeBakey Veteran's Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20682086

Citation

Lippa, Sara M., et al. "Postconcussive Symptoms After Blast and Nonblast-related Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries in Afghanistan and Iraq War Veterans." Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS, vol. 16, no. 5, 2010, pp. 856-66.
Lippa SM, Pastorek NJ, Benge JF, et al. Postconcussive symptoms after blast and nonblast-related mild traumatic brain injuries in Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans. J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2010;16(5):856-66.
Lippa, S. M., Pastorek, N. J., Benge, J. F., & Thornton, G. M. (2010). Postconcussive symptoms after blast and nonblast-related mild traumatic brain injuries in Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS, 16(5), 856-66. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1355617710000743
Lippa SM, et al. Postconcussive Symptoms After Blast and Nonblast-related Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries in Afghanistan and Iraq War Veterans. J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2010;16(5):856-66. PubMed PMID: 20682086.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Postconcussive symptoms after blast and nonblast-related mild traumatic brain injuries in Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans. AU - Lippa,Sara M, AU - Pastorek,Nicholas J, AU - Benge,Jared F, AU - Thornton,G Matthew, Y1 - 2010/08/04/ PY - 2010/8/5/entrez PY - 2010/8/5/pubmed PY - 2011/2/18/medline SP - 856 EP - 66 JF - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS JO - J Int Neuropsychol Soc VL - 16 IS - 5 N2 - Blast injury is common in current warfare, but little is known about the effects of blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Profile analyses were conducted investigating differences in self-reported postconcussive (PC) symptoms in 339 veteran outpatients with mTBI histories reporting current symptoms based on mechanism of injury (blast only, nonblast only, or both blast and nonblast), number of blast injuries, and distance from the blast. Veterans with any blast-related mTBI history were younger and reported higher posttraumatic stress symptoms than veterans with nonblast-related mTBI histories, with a marginally significant difference in posttraumatic stress symptom report between veterans reporting blast-related mTBI only and those reporting nonblast-related mTBI. The groups did not differ in terms of PC symptom severity or PC symptom cluster profiles. Among veterans with blast-related mTBI histories, PC symptom report did not vary by number of blast-related mTBIs or proximity to blast. Overall, posttraumatic stress symptoms accounted for a substantial portion of variance in PC symptom report. In veteran outpatients with remote mTBI histories who have enduring symptom complaints related to the mTBI, mechanism of injury did not clearly contribute to differential PC symptom severity or PC symptom cluster profile. Proximal rather than distal factors may be important intervention targets in returning symptomatic veterans with mTBI histories. SN - 1469-7661 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20682086/Postconcussive_symptoms_after_blast_and_nonblast_related_mild_traumatic_brain_injuries_in_Afghanistan_and_Iraq_war_veterans_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1355617710000743/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -