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An outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in U.S. Marines deployed to Liberia.
Am J Trop Med Hyg 2010; 83(2):258-65AJ

Abstract

In 2003, 44 U.S. Marines were evacuated from Liberia with either confirmed or presumed Plasmodium falciparum malaria. An outbreak investigation showed that only 19 (45%) used insect repellent, 5 (12%) used permethrin-treated clothing, and none used bed netting. Adherence with weekly mefloquine (MQ) was reported by 23 (55%). However, only 4 (10%) had serum MQ levels high enough to correlate with protection (> 794 ng/mL), and 9 (22%) had evidence of steady-state kinetics (MQ carboxy metabolite/MQ > 3.79). Tablets collected from Marines met USP identity and dissolution specifications for MQ. Testing failed to identify P. falciparum isolates with MQ resistance. This outbreak resulted from under use of personal protective measures and inadequate adherence with chemophrophylaxis. It is essential that all international travelers make malaria prevention measures a priority, especially when embarking to regions of the world with high transmission intensity such as west Africa..

Authors+Show Affiliations

Infectious Diseases Department, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA. timothy.whitman@med.navy.milNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20682864

Citation

Whitman, Timothy J., et al. "An Outbreak of Plasmodium Falciparum Malaria in U.S. Marines Deployed to Liberia." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 83, no. 2, 2010, pp. 258-65.
Whitman TJ, Coyne PE, Magill AJ, et al. An outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in U.S. Marines deployed to Liberia. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2010;83(2):258-65.
Whitman, T. J., Coyne, P. E., Magill, A. J., Blazes, D. L., Green, M. D., Milhous, W. K., ... Martin, G. J. (2010). An outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in U.S. Marines deployed to Liberia. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 83(2), pp. 258-65. doi:10.4269/ajtmh.2010.09-0774.
Whitman TJ, et al. An Outbreak of Plasmodium Falciparum Malaria in U.S. Marines Deployed to Liberia. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2010;83(2):258-65. PubMed PMID: 20682864.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in U.S. Marines deployed to Liberia. AU - Whitman,Timothy J, AU - Coyne,Philip E, AU - Magill,Alan J, AU - Blazes,David L, AU - Green,Michael D, AU - Milhous,Wilbur K, AU - Burgess,Timothy H, AU - Freilich,Daniel, AU - Tasker,Sybil A, AU - Azar,Ramzy G, AU - Endy,Timothy P, AU - Clagett,Christopher D, AU - Deye,Gregory A, AU - Shanks,G Dennis, AU - Martin,Gregory J, PY - 2010/8/5/entrez PY - 2010/8/5/pubmed PY - 2010/9/9/medline SP - 258 EP - 65 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. VL - 83 IS - 2 N2 - In 2003, 44 U.S. Marines were evacuated from Liberia with either confirmed or presumed Plasmodium falciparum malaria. An outbreak investigation showed that only 19 (45%) used insect repellent, 5 (12%) used permethrin-treated clothing, and none used bed netting. Adherence with weekly mefloquine (MQ) was reported by 23 (55%). However, only 4 (10%) had serum MQ levels high enough to correlate with protection (> 794 ng/mL), and 9 (22%) had evidence of steady-state kinetics (MQ carboxy metabolite/MQ > 3.79). Tablets collected from Marines met USP identity and dissolution specifications for MQ. Testing failed to identify P. falciparum isolates with MQ resistance. This outbreak resulted from under use of personal protective measures and inadequate adherence with chemophrophylaxis. It is essential that all international travelers make malaria prevention measures a priority, especially when embarking to regions of the world with high transmission intensity such as west Africa.. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20682864/full_citation L2 - http://www.ajtmh.org/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.2010.09-0774?crawler=true&mimetype=application/pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -