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Helicobacter pylori infection does not influence the efficacy of iron and vitamin B(12) fortification in marginally nourished Indian children.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Oct; 64(10):1101-7.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES

Helicobacter pylori infection and iron and vitamin B(12) deficiencies are widespread in economically disadvantaged populations. There is emerging evidence that H. pylori infection has a negative effect on the absorption of these micronutrients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of H. pylori infection on the efficacy of micronutrient (including iron and vitamin B(12))-fortified foods supplied for 1 year in marginally nourished children.

SUBJECTS/METHODS

In all, 543 Indian children, aged 6-10 years, participated in a double-blind, randomized controlled intervention trial, receiving foods fortified with either high (100% Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA)) or low (15% RDA) amounts of iron, vitamin B(12) and other micronutrients. The presence of H. pylori infection was diagnosed by the (13)C-labeled urea breath test at 11 months after the start of the intervention. Blood hemoglobin, serum ferritin (SF), total body iron and plasma vitamin B(12) were estimated at baseline and 12 months, and differences between these time points were assessed using an independent t-test.

RESULTS

Overall, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in this group of children was 79%. Baseline hemoglobin, SF, body iron and vitamin B(12) concentrations were not associated with H. pylori infection. The response to the intervention (either high or low amounts of iron and vitamin B(12) fortification) in terms of change in iron markers and vitamin B(12) status did not differ between children with and without H. pylori infection.

CONCLUSIONS

This study shows that the presence of H. pylori infection did not affect the efficacy of long-term iron and vitamin B(12) fortification in these marginally nourished children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutrition, St John's Research Institute, St John's National Academy of Health Sciences, Bangalore, India. prashanth@sjri.res.inNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20683455

Citation

Thankachan, P, et al. "Helicobacter Pylori Infection Does Not Influence the Efficacy of Iron and Vitamin B(12) Fortification in Marginally Nourished Indian Children." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 64, no. 10, 2010, pp. 1101-7.
Thankachan P, Muthayya S, Sierksma A, et al. Helicobacter pylori infection does not influence the efficacy of iron and vitamin B(12) fortification in marginally nourished Indian children. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010;64(10):1101-7.
Thankachan, P., Muthayya, S., Sierksma, A., Eilander, A., Thomas, T., Duchateau, G. S., Frenken, L. G., & Kurpad, A. V. (2010). Helicobacter pylori infection does not influence the efficacy of iron and vitamin B(12) fortification in marginally nourished Indian children. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 64(10), 1101-7. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2010.126
Thankachan P, et al. Helicobacter Pylori Infection Does Not Influence the Efficacy of Iron and Vitamin B(12) Fortification in Marginally Nourished Indian Children. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010;64(10):1101-7. PubMed PMID: 20683455.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Helicobacter pylori infection does not influence the efficacy of iron and vitamin B(12) fortification in marginally nourished Indian children. AU - Thankachan,P, AU - Muthayya,S, AU - Sierksma,A, AU - Eilander,A, AU - Thomas,T, AU - Duchateau,G S, AU - Frenken,L G J, AU - Kurpad,A V, Y1 - 2010/08/04/ PY - 2010/8/5/entrez PY - 2010/8/5/pubmed PY - 2011/2/15/medline SP - 1101 EP - 7 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 64 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Helicobacter pylori infection and iron and vitamin B(12) deficiencies are widespread in economically disadvantaged populations. There is emerging evidence that H. pylori infection has a negative effect on the absorption of these micronutrients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of H. pylori infection on the efficacy of micronutrient (including iron and vitamin B(12))-fortified foods supplied for 1 year in marginally nourished children. SUBJECTS/METHODS: In all, 543 Indian children, aged 6-10 years, participated in a double-blind, randomized controlled intervention trial, receiving foods fortified with either high (100% Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA)) or low (15% RDA) amounts of iron, vitamin B(12) and other micronutrients. The presence of H. pylori infection was diagnosed by the (13)C-labeled urea breath test at 11 months after the start of the intervention. Blood hemoglobin, serum ferritin (SF), total body iron and plasma vitamin B(12) were estimated at baseline and 12 months, and differences between these time points were assessed using an independent t-test. RESULTS: Overall, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in this group of children was 79%. Baseline hemoglobin, SF, body iron and vitamin B(12) concentrations were not associated with H. pylori infection. The response to the intervention (either high or low amounts of iron and vitamin B(12) fortification) in terms of change in iron markers and vitamin B(12) status did not differ between children with and without H. pylori infection. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the presence of H. pylori infection did not affect the efficacy of long-term iron and vitamin B(12) fortification in these marginally nourished children. SN - 1476-5640 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20683455/Helicobacter_pylori_infection_does_not_influence_the_efficacy_of_iron_and_vitamin_B_12__fortification_in_marginally_nourished_Indian_children_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2010.126 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -