Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Rotarix in developing countries: paving the way for inclusion in national childhood immunization programs in Africa.
J Infect Dis. 2010 Sep 01; 202 Suppl:S80-6.JI

Abstract

Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes more than half a million deaths annually among children aged <5 years, the great majority of which occur in Africa and Asia. Vaccination is considered to be the most effective public health strategy to prevent rotavirus disease and to reduce the significant global burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis. Rotarix (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) is an oral, live attenuated rotavirus vaccine derived from a human G1P[8] rotavirus strain. Results of phase III studies in Europe, Latin America, and Asia have shown that Rotarix offers sustained high protection against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis during the first 2 years of life, when disease burden is highest, with broad protection demonstrated against each of the 5 main rotavirus types that circulate globally (G1, G2, G3, G4, and G9). Coupled with the availability of local burden of disease data and promising interim efficacy data from an ongoing study in Malawi and South Africa, this further reinforces the case for introduction of this rotavirus vaccine in national childhood immunization programs in Africa, where rotavirus-related mortality is significant.

Authors+Show Affiliations

GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Rixensart, Belgium.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20684722

Citation

Pawinski, Robert, et al. "Rotarix in Developing Countries: Paving the Way for Inclusion in National Childhood Immunization Programs in Africa." The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 202 Suppl, 2010, pp. S80-6.
Pawinski R, Debrus S, Delem A, et al. Rotarix in developing countries: paving the way for inclusion in national childhood immunization programs in Africa. J Infect Dis. 2010;202 Suppl:S80-6.
Pawinski, R., Debrus, S., Delem, A., Smolenov, I., Suryakiran, P. V., & Han, H. H. (2010). Rotarix in developing countries: paving the way for inclusion in national childhood immunization programs in Africa. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 202 Suppl, S80-6. https://doi.org/10.1086/653547
Pawinski R, et al. Rotarix in Developing Countries: Paving the Way for Inclusion in National Childhood Immunization Programs in Africa. J Infect Dis. 2010 Sep 1;202 Suppl:S80-6. PubMed PMID: 20684722.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rotarix in developing countries: paving the way for inclusion in national childhood immunization programs in Africa. AU - Pawinski,Robert, AU - Debrus,Serge, AU - Delem,Andrée, AU - Smolenov,Igor, AU - Suryakiran,Pemmaraju V, AU - Han,Htay Htay, PY - 2010/8/6/entrez PY - 2010/8/13/pubmed PY - 2010/9/9/medline SP - S80 EP - 6 JF - The Journal of infectious diseases JO - J. Infect. Dis. VL - 202 Suppl N2 - Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes more than half a million deaths annually among children aged <5 years, the great majority of which occur in Africa and Asia. Vaccination is considered to be the most effective public health strategy to prevent rotavirus disease and to reduce the significant global burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis. Rotarix (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) is an oral, live attenuated rotavirus vaccine derived from a human G1P[8] rotavirus strain. Results of phase III studies in Europe, Latin America, and Asia have shown that Rotarix offers sustained high protection against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis during the first 2 years of life, when disease burden is highest, with broad protection demonstrated against each of the 5 main rotavirus types that circulate globally (G1, G2, G3, G4, and G9). Coupled with the availability of local burden of disease data and promising interim efficacy data from an ongoing study in Malawi and South Africa, this further reinforces the case for introduction of this rotavirus vaccine in national childhood immunization programs in Africa, where rotavirus-related mortality is significant. SN - 1537-6613 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20684722/Rotarix_in_developing_countries:_paving_the_way_for_inclusion_in_national_childhood_immunization_programs_in_Africa_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/653547 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -