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Antinociception and sedation following intracerebroventricular administration of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol in female vs. male rats.

Abstract

Systemically administered cannabinoids produce greater antinociceptive and sedative effects in female compared to male rats. Sex differences in the brain endocannabinoid system have also been reported. The aim of this study was to determine whether sex differences in antinociceptive and motoric effects of a cannabinoid can be attributed to supraspinal mechanisms. Vehicle or Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, 100 μg) was administered i.c.v., and behavioral effects were compared between gonadally intact male and female rats, and among females in different estrous stages (early proestrus, late proestrus, estrus and diestrus). Antinociception on the tail withdrawal and paw pressure tests after i.c.v. THC was slightly but not significantly greater in females (pooled across estrous stages) compared to males. THC suppressed locomotor activity similarly in all groups, with the exception that only males showed hyperlocomotion at 4 h post-injection. When females in the four estrous stages were compared, females in late proestrus showed significantly greater THC-induced antinociception than females in estrus (and males). These results suggest that supraspinal mechanisms may contribute to greater systemic THC effects in females compared to males, and to estrous stage-dependent differences in THC effects among females.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Psychology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4820, United States. awakley@wsu.edu

    Source

    Behavioural brain research 216:1 2011 Jan 01 pg 200-6

    MeSH

    Analgesia
    Analgesics, Non-Narcotic
    Analysis of Variance
    Animals
    Dronabinol
    Estrous Cycle
    Female
    Hot Temperature
    Male
    Motor Activity
    Pain
    Pain Measurement
    Rats
    Rats, Sprague-Dawley
    Sex Characteristics

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    20692296

    Citation

    * When formatting your citation, note that all book, journal, and database titles should be italicized* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Antinociception and sedation following intracerebroventricular administration of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol in female vs. male rats. AU - Wakley,Alexa A, AU - Craft,Rebecca M, Y1 - 2010/08/06/ PY - 2010/05/28/received PY - 2010/07/23/revised PY - 2010/07/28/accepted PY - 2010/8/10/entrez PY - 2010/8/10/pubmed PY - 2011/2/22/medline SP - 200 EP - 6 JF - Behavioural brain research JO - Behav. Brain Res. VL - 216 IS - 1 N2 - Systemically administered cannabinoids produce greater antinociceptive and sedative effects in female compared to male rats. Sex differences in the brain endocannabinoid system have also been reported. The aim of this study was to determine whether sex differences in antinociceptive and motoric effects of a cannabinoid can be attributed to supraspinal mechanisms. Vehicle or Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, 100 μg) was administered i.c.v., and behavioral effects were compared between gonadally intact male and female rats, and among females in different estrous stages (early proestrus, late proestrus, estrus and diestrus). Antinociception on the tail withdrawal and paw pressure tests after i.c.v. THC was slightly but not significantly greater in females (pooled across estrous stages) compared to males. THC suppressed locomotor activity similarly in all groups, with the exception that only males showed hyperlocomotion at 4 h post-injection. When females in the four estrous stages were compared, females in late proestrus showed significantly greater THC-induced antinociception than females in estrus (and males). These results suggest that supraspinal mechanisms may contribute to greater systemic THC effects in females compared to males, and to estrous stage-dependent differences in THC effects among females. SN - 1872-7549 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20692296/abstract/Antinociception_and_sedation_following_intracerebroventricular_administration_of_Δ⁹_tetrahydrocannabinol_in_female_vs__male_rats_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0166-4328(10)00538-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -