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Executive and intellectual functions in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder with and without comorbidity.
Brain Dev. 2011 Jun; 33(6):462-9.BD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Recent neuropsychological theories have targeted deficient executive functions (EF) as the main characteristic of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), but the nature of the neuropsychological deficits remains elusive and findings are heterogeneous. In particular, it is still unclear whether ADHD subtypes and comorbidity affect intellectual and executive functioning, because large variability has been found in different patient populations. Furthermore, the role of IQ in EF deficits in individuals with ADHD has been debated.

METHODS

The aim of the present research was to study in detail the relationship between EF, ADHD subtypes, and comorbid diagnosis by taking into account the potential role of IQ. For this purpose, 23 children (aged from 5 to 16 years; 20 males and 3 females) with a diagnosis of ADHD were selected.

RESULTS

Data show no differences between children with different subtypes of ADHD on measures of EF, but they evidence differences on EF measures in children with different comorbidities (internalizing versus externalizing disorder). Namely, compared to the internalizing disorders group, the children with externalizing disorders obtained significantly lower scores on different measures of EF (i.e., verbal working memory and categorical fluency), but these differences were strictly dependent on IQ level.

CONCLUSIONS

Comorbidity patterns, rather than ADHD subtypes, appear to be more valid for defining the neuropsychological features of the ADHD endophenotype. Moreover, general intelligence seems to play a substantial role in the cognitive processes underling the disorder, especially in relation to externalizing aspects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Children's Hospital Bambino Gesù, Rome, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20692779

Citation

Di Trani, Michela, et al. "Executive and Intellectual Functions in Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder With and Without Comorbidity." Brain & Development, vol. 33, no. 6, 2011, pp. 462-9.
Di Trani M, Casini MP, Capuzzo F, et al. Executive and intellectual functions in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder with and without comorbidity. Brain Dev. 2011;33(6):462-9.
Di Trani, M., Casini, M. P., Capuzzo, F., Gentile, S., Bianco, G., Menghini, D., & Vicari, S. (2011). Executive and intellectual functions in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder with and without comorbidity. Brain & Development, 33(6), 462-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.braindev.2010.06.002
Di Trani M, et al. Executive and Intellectual Functions in Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder With and Without Comorbidity. Brain Dev. 2011;33(6):462-9. PubMed PMID: 20692779.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Executive and intellectual functions in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder with and without comorbidity. AU - Di Trani,Michela, AU - Casini,Maria Pia, AU - Capuzzo,Francesca, AU - Gentile,Simonetta, AU - Bianco,Giuseppe, AU - Menghini,Deny, AU - Vicari,Stefano, Y1 - 2010/08/07/ PY - 2009/09/10/received PY - 2010/04/30/revised PY - 2010/06/01/accepted PY - 2010/8/10/entrez PY - 2010/8/10/pubmed PY - 2011/9/14/medline SP - 462 EP - 9 JF - Brain & development JO - Brain Dev VL - 33 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Recent neuropsychological theories have targeted deficient executive functions (EF) as the main characteristic of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), but the nature of the neuropsychological deficits remains elusive and findings are heterogeneous. In particular, it is still unclear whether ADHD subtypes and comorbidity affect intellectual and executive functioning, because large variability has been found in different patient populations. Furthermore, the role of IQ in EF deficits in individuals with ADHD has been debated. METHODS: The aim of the present research was to study in detail the relationship between EF, ADHD subtypes, and comorbid diagnosis by taking into account the potential role of IQ. For this purpose, 23 children (aged from 5 to 16 years; 20 males and 3 females) with a diagnosis of ADHD were selected. RESULTS: Data show no differences between children with different subtypes of ADHD on measures of EF, but they evidence differences on EF measures in children with different comorbidities (internalizing versus externalizing disorder). Namely, compared to the internalizing disorders group, the children with externalizing disorders obtained significantly lower scores on different measures of EF (i.e., verbal working memory and categorical fluency), but these differences were strictly dependent on IQ level. CONCLUSIONS: Comorbidity patterns, rather than ADHD subtypes, appear to be more valid for defining the neuropsychological features of the ADHD endophenotype. Moreover, general intelligence seems to play a substantial role in the cognitive processes underling the disorder, especially in relation to externalizing aspects. SN - 1872-7131 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20692779/Executive_and_intellectual_functions_in_attention_deficit/hyperactivity_disorder_with_and_without_comorbidity_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0387-7604(10)00133-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -