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Monitoring the uptake and redistribution of metal nanoparticles during cell culture using surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy.
Anal Chem. 2010 Sep 01; 82(17):7369-73.AC

Abstract

We describe the uptake of silver nanoparticles by CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells and their subsequent fate as a result of cell division during culture, as monitored by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. Mapping of populations of cells containing both labeled and native nanoparticles by SERS spectroscopy imaging provided a quantitative method by which the number of intracellular nanoparticles could be monitored. Initially, for a given amount of nanoparticles, the relationship between the number taken up into the cell and the time of incubation was explored. Subsequently, the redistribution of intracellular nanoparticles upon multiple rounds of cell division was investigated. Intracellular SERS signatures remained detectable in the cells for up to four generations, although the abundance and intensity of the signals declined rapidly as nanoparticles were shared with daughter cells. The intensity of the SERS signal was dependent both on stability of the label and their abundance (nanoparticle aggregation increases the extent of the SERS enhancement). The data show that while the labeled nanoparticles remain stable for prolonged periods, during cell division, the changes in signal could be attributed both to a decrease in abundance and distribution (and hence aggregation).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, The Bioelectronics Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT, Scotland, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20695440

Citation

Sirimuthu, Narayana M S., et al. "Monitoring the Uptake and Redistribution of Metal Nanoparticles During Cell Culture Using Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Spectroscopy." Analytical Chemistry, vol. 82, no. 17, 2010, pp. 7369-73.
Sirimuthu NM, Syme CD, Cooper JM. Monitoring the uptake and redistribution of metal nanoparticles during cell culture using surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy. Anal Chem. 2010;82(17):7369-73.
Sirimuthu, N. M., Syme, C. D., & Cooper, J. M. (2010). Monitoring the uptake and redistribution of metal nanoparticles during cell culture using surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy. Analytical Chemistry, 82(17), 7369-73. https://doi.org/10.1021/ac101480t
Sirimuthu NM, Syme CD, Cooper JM. Monitoring the Uptake and Redistribution of Metal Nanoparticles During Cell Culture Using Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Spectroscopy. Anal Chem. 2010 Sep 1;82(17):7369-73. PubMed PMID: 20695440.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Monitoring the uptake and redistribution of metal nanoparticles during cell culture using surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy. AU - Sirimuthu,Narayana M S, AU - Syme,Christopher D, AU - Cooper,Jonathan M, PY - 2010/8/11/entrez PY - 2010/8/11/pubmed PY - 2011/1/5/medline SP - 7369 EP - 73 JF - Analytical chemistry JO - Anal Chem VL - 82 IS - 17 N2 - We describe the uptake of silver nanoparticles by CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells and their subsequent fate as a result of cell division during culture, as monitored by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. Mapping of populations of cells containing both labeled and native nanoparticles by SERS spectroscopy imaging provided a quantitative method by which the number of intracellular nanoparticles could be monitored. Initially, for a given amount of nanoparticles, the relationship between the number taken up into the cell and the time of incubation was explored. Subsequently, the redistribution of intracellular nanoparticles upon multiple rounds of cell division was investigated. Intracellular SERS signatures remained detectable in the cells for up to four generations, although the abundance and intensity of the signals declined rapidly as nanoparticles were shared with daughter cells. The intensity of the SERS signal was dependent both on stability of the label and their abundance (nanoparticle aggregation increases the extent of the SERS enhancement). The data show that while the labeled nanoparticles remain stable for prolonged periods, during cell division, the changes in signal could be attributed both to a decrease in abundance and distribution (and hence aggregation). SN - 1520-6882 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20695440/Monitoring_the_uptake_and_redistribution_of_metal_nanoparticles_during_cell_culture_using_surface_enhanced_Raman_scattering_spectroscopy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/ac101480t DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -