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Early life exposure to the 1959-1961 Chinese famine has long-term health consequences.
J Nutr 2010; 140(10):1874-8JN

Abstract

The Chinese famine of 1959-1961 was the largest in human history. We used data on 35,025 women born in 1957-1963 to assess the impact of famine exposure on height, BMI, and hypertension at ~32 y of age. The data were from the China-U.S. Collaborative Project for Neural Tube Defect Prevention. The famine varied in intensity across provinces and counties and affected rural areas disproportionately. We used a measure of famine intensity at the county level based on the size of birth year cohorts in a difference-in-difference model, which compared each cohort to the unexposed 1963 cohort, after correcting for age and time trends, and estimated impact for the average level of intensity across counties. The impact was confined to rural areas, but this could be due to small sample sizes in urban areas. Height was reduced in the 1958 and 1959 cohorts by 1.7 and 1.3 cm, respectively. This corresponded to exposures during 0.5-3.5 y for the 1958 cohort and late pregnancy and 0-2.5 y for the 1959 cohort. BMI increased by 0.92 kg/m(2) in the 1957 cohort, exposed from 1.5 to 4.5 y, but decreased by 0.3 kg/m(2) in the 1960-1961 cohorts, exposed during pregnancy and infancy. Famine exposure was associated with a 3-fold increase in the odds of hypertension for the 1958 cohort. In general, postnatal exposure during the first 2-3 y of life reduced height and increased BMI and hypertension, whereas exposure during pregnancy and infancy reduced BMI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20702751

Citation

Huang, Cheng, et al. "Early Life Exposure to the 1959-1961 Chinese Famine Has Long-term Health Consequences." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 140, no. 10, 2010, pp. 1874-8.
Huang C, Li Z, Wang M, et al. Early life exposure to the 1959-1961 Chinese famine has long-term health consequences. J Nutr. 2010;140(10):1874-8.
Huang, C., Li, Z., Wang, M., & Martorell, R. (2010). Early life exposure to the 1959-1961 Chinese famine has long-term health consequences. The Journal of Nutrition, 140(10), pp. 1874-8. doi:10.3945/jn.110.121293.
Huang C, et al. Early Life Exposure to the 1959-1961 Chinese Famine Has Long-term Health Consequences. J Nutr. 2010;140(10):1874-8. PubMed PMID: 20702751.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early life exposure to the 1959-1961 Chinese famine has long-term health consequences. AU - Huang,Cheng, AU - Li,Zhu, AU - Wang,Meng, AU - Martorell,Reynaldo, Y1 - 2010/08/11/ PY - 2010/8/13/entrez PY - 2010/8/13/pubmed PY - 2010/10/20/medline SP - 1874 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 140 IS - 10 N2 - The Chinese famine of 1959-1961 was the largest in human history. We used data on 35,025 women born in 1957-1963 to assess the impact of famine exposure on height, BMI, and hypertension at ~32 y of age. The data were from the China-U.S. Collaborative Project for Neural Tube Defect Prevention. The famine varied in intensity across provinces and counties and affected rural areas disproportionately. We used a measure of famine intensity at the county level based on the size of birth year cohorts in a difference-in-difference model, which compared each cohort to the unexposed 1963 cohort, after correcting for age and time trends, and estimated impact for the average level of intensity across counties. The impact was confined to rural areas, but this could be due to small sample sizes in urban areas. Height was reduced in the 1958 and 1959 cohorts by 1.7 and 1.3 cm, respectively. This corresponded to exposures during 0.5-3.5 y for the 1958 cohort and late pregnancy and 0-2.5 y for the 1959 cohort. BMI increased by 0.92 kg/m(2) in the 1957 cohort, exposed from 1.5 to 4.5 y, but decreased by 0.3 kg/m(2) in the 1960-1961 cohorts, exposed during pregnancy and infancy. Famine exposure was associated with a 3-fold increase in the odds of hypertension for the 1958 cohort. In general, postnatal exposure during the first 2-3 y of life reduced height and increased BMI and hypertension, whereas exposure during pregnancy and infancy reduced BMI. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20702751/Early_life_exposure_to_the_1959_1961_Chinese_famine_has_long_term_health_consequences_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.110.121293 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -