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Relationship between methamphetamine-induced behavioral activation and hyperthermia.
Brain Res 2010; 1357:41-52BR

Abstract

Methamphetamine (METH) changes core temperature and induces behavioral activation. Behavioral activation is also known to change core temperature. The purpose of this report was to 1.) evaluate the extent to which the behavioral activation induced by METH showed a temporal relationship to METH-induced hyperthermia; and 2.) describe the temporal pattern of METH-induced hyperthermia over an extended dose range. Rats were treated with saline or METH (0.5-10.0mg/kg) in computer-controlled chambers with ambient temperature maintained at 24°C. Continuous telemetric core temperature measurements were made during a 7h test period. Behavioral observations were made once every 15 min using an 11-point scale ranging from 0 (quiet awake) to 10 (focused licking or biting). The onset of METH-induced behavioral activation occurred at 15-30 min after treatment for all doses and preceded core temperature increases; the onset of METH-induced hyperthermia ranged from 45 min post-treatment to 120 min post-treatment. This behavior-temperature delay was 15-30 min at the lowest (0.5 and 1.0mg/kg) and the highest (7.0, 8.0, and 10.0mg/kg) doses tested; the delay was increased between 1.0 and 4.0mg/kg METH (105 min delay at 4.0mg/kg) and then decreased again from 4.0 to 10.0mg/kg. The strongest relationship between core temperature and behavioral activation occurred at 180 min post-treatment. These data suggest that factors other than behavior are primarily responsible for the observed core temperature effects during the initial post-treatment period (60 min peak); possible effects from movement are masked. For the latter post-treatment period (180 min peak) the stronger relationship between temperature and behavior suggests a role for movement in METH-induced hyperthermia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Engineering, University of Mississippi, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20709036

Citation

Phelps, Greg, et al. "Relationship Between Methamphetamine-induced Behavioral Activation and Hyperthermia." Brain Research, vol. 1357, 2010, pp. 41-52.
Phelps G, Speaker HA, Sabol KE. Relationship between methamphetamine-induced behavioral activation and hyperthermia. Brain Res. 2010;1357:41-52.
Phelps, G., Speaker, H. A., & Sabol, K. E. (2010). Relationship between methamphetamine-induced behavioral activation and hyperthermia. Brain Research, 1357, pp. 41-52. doi:10.1016/j.brainres.2010.08.017.
Phelps G, Speaker HA, Sabol KE. Relationship Between Methamphetamine-induced Behavioral Activation and Hyperthermia. Brain Res. 2010 Oct 21;1357:41-52. PubMed PMID: 20709036.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship between methamphetamine-induced behavioral activation and hyperthermia. AU - Phelps,Greg, AU - Speaker,H Anton, AU - Sabol,Karen E, Y1 - 2010/08/13/ PY - 2009/09/06/received PY - 2010/08/05/revised PY - 2010/08/06/accepted PY - 2010/8/17/entrez PY - 2010/8/17/pubmed PY - 2011/1/15/medline SP - 41 EP - 52 JF - Brain research JO - Brain Res. VL - 1357 N2 - Methamphetamine (METH) changes core temperature and induces behavioral activation. Behavioral activation is also known to change core temperature. The purpose of this report was to 1.) evaluate the extent to which the behavioral activation induced by METH showed a temporal relationship to METH-induced hyperthermia; and 2.) describe the temporal pattern of METH-induced hyperthermia over an extended dose range. Rats were treated with saline or METH (0.5-10.0mg/kg) in computer-controlled chambers with ambient temperature maintained at 24°C. Continuous telemetric core temperature measurements were made during a 7h test period. Behavioral observations were made once every 15 min using an 11-point scale ranging from 0 (quiet awake) to 10 (focused licking or biting). The onset of METH-induced behavioral activation occurred at 15-30 min after treatment for all doses and preceded core temperature increases; the onset of METH-induced hyperthermia ranged from 45 min post-treatment to 120 min post-treatment. This behavior-temperature delay was 15-30 min at the lowest (0.5 and 1.0mg/kg) and the highest (7.0, 8.0, and 10.0mg/kg) doses tested; the delay was increased between 1.0 and 4.0mg/kg METH (105 min delay at 4.0mg/kg) and then decreased again from 4.0 to 10.0mg/kg. The strongest relationship between core temperature and behavioral activation occurred at 180 min post-treatment. These data suggest that factors other than behavior are primarily responsible for the observed core temperature effects during the initial post-treatment period (60 min peak); possible effects from movement are masked. For the latter post-treatment period (180 min peak) the stronger relationship between temperature and behavior suggests a role for movement in METH-induced hyperthermia. SN - 1872-6240 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20709036/Relationship_between_methamphetamine_induced_behavioral_activation_and_hyperthermia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0006-8993(10)01764-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -