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Proteome of human calcium kidney stones.
Urology. 2010 Oct; 76(4):1017.e13-20.U

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Idiopathic calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones are believed to develop attached to papillary subepithelial deposits called Randall's plaques. Calcium phosphate (CaP) stones, conversely, are thought to arise within the inner medullary collecting ducts, enlarging and damaging surround tubular structures as they expand. If this is true, we theorize that differences will be seen within the organic portion (matrix) of CaOx stones compared with CaP stones using a mass spectroscopy (MS) approach.

METHODS

From a cohort of 47 powdered stones, 25 calculi (13 CaOx, 12 CaP) were confirmed to contain a dominant mineral content of >80% by powder x-ray diffraction. Matrix proteins were then extracted, purified, and digested. Peptide tandem MS data were acquired, and spectra were searched against a large human protein database to identify protein matches.

RESULTS

No significant differences were seen between pattern profiles of CaOx and CaP stones. However, variations in protein expression patterns were seen within individual CaOx (monohydrate and dihydrate) and CaP (apatite and brushite) mineral subtypes, suggesting a relationship between crystal-surface binding properties and matrix composition. Both groups contain a large number of inflammatory proteins and a catalog of common proteins is included.

CONCLUSIONS

Calcium kidney stone matrix contains hundreds of proteins and is predominated by proteins associated with inflammatory response. Many of the same proteins were identified in both CaOx and CaP stones, suggesting inflammation as a unifying origin or a common secondary role in calcium stone pathogenesis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. Benjamin.canales@urology.ufl.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20709378

Citation

Canales, Benjamin K., et al. "Proteome of Human Calcium Kidney Stones." Urology, vol. 76, no. 4, 2010, pp. 1017.e13-20.
Canales BK, Anderson L, Higgins L, et al. Proteome of human calcium kidney stones. Urology. 2010;76(4):1017.e13-20.
Canales, B. K., Anderson, L., Higgins, L., Ensrud-Bowlin, K., Roberts, K. P., Wu, B., Kim, I. W., & Monga, M. (2010). Proteome of human calcium kidney stones. Urology, 76(4), e13-20. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2010.05.005
Canales BK, et al. Proteome of Human Calcium Kidney Stones. Urology. 2010;76(4):1017.e13-20. PubMed PMID: 20709378.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Proteome of human calcium kidney stones. AU - Canales,Benjamin K, AU - Anderson,Lorraine, AU - Higgins,Leeann, AU - Ensrud-Bowlin,Kathy, AU - Roberts,Ken P, AU - Wu,Baolin, AU - Kim,Il Won, AU - Monga,Manoj, Y1 - 2010/08/14/ PY - 2010/01/30/received PY - 2010/04/21/revised PY - 2010/05/05/accepted PY - 2010/8/17/entrez PY - 2010/8/17/pubmed PY - 2010/11/16/medline SP - 1017.e13 EP - 20 JF - Urology JO - Urology VL - 76 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Idiopathic calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones are believed to develop attached to papillary subepithelial deposits called Randall's plaques. Calcium phosphate (CaP) stones, conversely, are thought to arise within the inner medullary collecting ducts, enlarging and damaging surround tubular structures as they expand. If this is true, we theorize that differences will be seen within the organic portion (matrix) of CaOx stones compared with CaP stones using a mass spectroscopy (MS) approach. METHODS: From a cohort of 47 powdered stones, 25 calculi (13 CaOx, 12 CaP) were confirmed to contain a dominant mineral content of >80% by powder x-ray diffraction. Matrix proteins were then extracted, purified, and digested. Peptide tandem MS data were acquired, and spectra were searched against a large human protein database to identify protein matches. RESULTS: No significant differences were seen between pattern profiles of CaOx and CaP stones. However, variations in protein expression patterns were seen within individual CaOx (monohydrate and dihydrate) and CaP (apatite and brushite) mineral subtypes, suggesting a relationship between crystal-surface binding properties and matrix composition. Both groups contain a large number of inflammatory proteins and a catalog of common proteins is included. CONCLUSIONS: Calcium kidney stone matrix contains hundreds of proteins and is predominated by proteins associated with inflammatory response. Many of the same proteins were identified in both CaOx and CaP stones, suggesting inflammation as a unifying origin or a common secondary role in calcium stone pathogenesis. SN - 1527-9995 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20709378/Proteome_of_human_calcium_kidney_stones_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0090-4295(10)00654-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -