Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Saturated fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease: modulation by replacement nutrients.
Curr Atheroscler Rep 2010; 12(6):384-90CA

Abstract

Despite the well-established observation that substitution of saturated fats for carbohydrates or unsaturated fats increases low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in humans and animal models, the relationship of saturated fat intake to risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in humans remains controversial. A critical question is what macronutrient should be used to replace saturated fat. Substituting polyunsaturated fat for saturated fat reduces LDL cholesterol and the total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio. However, replacement of saturated fat by carbohydrates, particularly refined carbohydrates and added sugars, increases levels of triglyceride and small LDL particles and reduces high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, effects that are of particular concern in the context of the increased prevalence of obesity and insulin resistance. Epidemiologic studies and randomized clinical trials have provided consistent evidence that replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat, but not carbohydrates, is beneficial for coronary heart disease. Therefore, dietary recommendations should emphasize substitution of polyunsaturated fat and minimally processed grains for saturated fat.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Atherosclerosis Research, Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609, USA. psiri@chori.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20711693

Citation

Siri-Tarino, Patty W., et al. "Saturated Fatty Acids and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: Modulation By Replacement Nutrients." Current Atherosclerosis Reports, vol. 12, no. 6, 2010, pp. 384-90.
Siri-Tarino PW, Sun Q, Hu FB, et al. Saturated fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease: modulation by replacement nutrients. Curr Atheroscler Rep. 2010;12(6):384-90.
Siri-Tarino, P. W., Sun, Q., Hu, F. B., & Krauss, R. M. (2010). Saturated fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease: modulation by replacement nutrients. Current Atherosclerosis Reports, 12(6), pp. 384-90. doi:10.1007/s11883-010-0131-6.
Siri-Tarino PW, et al. Saturated Fatty Acids and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: Modulation By Replacement Nutrients. Curr Atheroscler Rep. 2010;12(6):384-90. PubMed PMID: 20711693.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Saturated fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease: modulation by replacement nutrients. AU - Siri-Tarino,Patty W, AU - Sun,Qi, AU - Hu,Frank B, AU - Krauss,Ronald M, PY - 2010/8/17/entrez PY - 2010/8/17/pubmed PY - 2011/2/9/medline SP - 384 EP - 90 JF - Current atherosclerosis reports JO - Curr Atheroscler Rep VL - 12 IS - 6 N2 - Despite the well-established observation that substitution of saturated fats for carbohydrates or unsaturated fats increases low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in humans and animal models, the relationship of saturated fat intake to risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in humans remains controversial. A critical question is what macronutrient should be used to replace saturated fat. Substituting polyunsaturated fat for saturated fat reduces LDL cholesterol and the total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio. However, replacement of saturated fat by carbohydrates, particularly refined carbohydrates and added sugars, increases levels of triglyceride and small LDL particles and reduces high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, effects that are of particular concern in the context of the increased prevalence of obesity and insulin resistance. Epidemiologic studies and randomized clinical trials have provided consistent evidence that replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat, but not carbohydrates, is beneficial for coronary heart disease. Therefore, dietary recommendations should emphasize substitution of polyunsaturated fat and minimally processed grains for saturated fat. SN - 1534-6242 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20711693/Saturated_fatty_acids_and_risk_of_coronary_heart_disease:_modulation_by_replacement_nutrients_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11883-010-0131-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -