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Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection and tracking of nanoprobes: enhanced uptake and nuclear targeting in single cells.
Appl Spectrosc. 2010 Aug; 64(8):858-66.AS

Abstract

We describe the development and application of a co-functionalized nanoprobe and biodelivery platform combining a nuclear targeting peptide (NTP) for improved cellular uptake and intracellular targeting with p-mercaptobenzoic acid (pMBA) as a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) reporter for tracking and imaging. The nuclear targeting peptide, an HIV-1 protein-derived TAT sequence, has been previously shown to aid entry of cargo through the cell membrane via normal cellular processes, and furthermore, to localize small cargo to the nucleus of the cell. Previous work in our lab has verified cell uptake and distribution of the nanoprobes in clinically relevant mouse and human cell lines. In this work, two-dimensional SERS mapping was used to track the spatial and temporal progress of nanoparticle uptake in PC-3 human prostate cells and to characterize localization at various time points, demonstrating the potential for an intracellularly targeted multiplexed nanobiosensing system with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Silver nanoparticles co-functionalized with the TAT peptide showed greatly enhanced cellular uptake over the control nanoparticles lacking the targeting moiety. The ability to detect and monitor nanoprobe trafficking using SERS spectroscopy offers an improved alternative over previous tracking and detection methods such as light microscopy and fluorescence methods. The development of multifunctional nanoconstructs for intracellular delivery has potential clinical applications in early detection and selective treatment of disease in affected cells. Other applications include use in basic research aimed at understanding the inner workings of living cells and how they respond to chemical and biological stimuli.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20719048

Citation

Gregas, Molly K., et al. "Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Detection and Tracking of Nanoprobes: Enhanced Uptake and Nuclear Targeting in Single Cells." Applied Spectroscopy, vol. 64, no. 8, 2010, pp. 858-66.
Gregas MK, Scaffidi JP, Lauly B, et al. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection and tracking of nanoprobes: enhanced uptake and nuclear targeting in single cells. Appl Spectrosc. 2010;64(8):858-66.
Gregas, M. K., Scaffidi, J. P., Lauly, B., & Vo-Dinh, T. (2010). Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection and tracking of nanoprobes: enhanced uptake and nuclear targeting in single cells. Applied Spectroscopy, 64(8), 858-66. https://doi.org/10.1366/000370210792081037
Gregas MK, et al. Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Detection and Tracking of Nanoprobes: Enhanced Uptake and Nuclear Targeting in Single Cells. Appl Spectrosc. 2010;64(8):858-66. PubMed PMID: 20719048.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection and tracking of nanoprobes: enhanced uptake and nuclear targeting in single cells. AU - Gregas,Molly K, AU - Scaffidi,Jonathan P, AU - Lauly,Benoit, AU - Vo-Dinh,Tuan, PY - 2010/8/20/entrez PY - 2010/8/20/pubmed PY - 2010/12/14/medline SP - 858 EP - 66 JF - Applied spectroscopy JO - Appl Spectrosc VL - 64 IS - 8 N2 - We describe the development and application of a co-functionalized nanoprobe and biodelivery platform combining a nuclear targeting peptide (NTP) for improved cellular uptake and intracellular targeting with p-mercaptobenzoic acid (pMBA) as a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) reporter for tracking and imaging. The nuclear targeting peptide, an HIV-1 protein-derived TAT sequence, has been previously shown to aid entry of cargo through the cell membrane via normal cellular processes, and furthermore, to localize small cargo to the nucleus of the cell. Previous work in our lab has verified cell uptake and distribution of the nanoprobes in clinically relevant mouse and human cell lines. In this work, two-dimensional SERS mapping was used to track the spatial and temporal progress of nanoparticle uptake in PC-3 human prostate cells and to characterize localization at various time points, demonstrating the potential for an intracellularly targeted multiplexed nanobiosensing system with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Silver nanoparticles co-functionalized with the TAT peptide showed greatly enhanced cellular uptake over the control nanoparticles lacking the targeting moiety. The ability to detect and monitor nanoprobe trafficking using SERS spectroscopy offers an improved alternative over previous tracking and detection methods such as light microscopy and fluorescence methods. The development of multifunctional nanoconstructs for intracellular delivery has potential clinical applications in early detection and selective treatment of disease in affected cells. Other applications include use in basic research aimed at understanding the inner workings of living cells and how they respond to chemical and biological stimuli. SN - 1943-3530 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20719048/Surface_enhanced_Raman_scattering_detection_and_tracking_of_nanoprobes:_enhanced_uptake_and_nuclear_targeting_in_single_cells_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1366/000370210792081037?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -