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Similarities and differences in perceiving threat from dynamic faces and bodies. An fMRI study.
Neuroimage. 2011 Jan 15; 54(2):1755-62.N

Abstract

Neuroscientific research on the perception of emotional signals has mainly focused on how the brain processes threat signals from photographs of facial expressions. Much less is known about body postures or about the processing of dynamic images. We undertook a systematic comparison of the neurofunctional network dedicated to processing facial and bodily expressions. Two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments investigated whether areas involved in processing social signals are activated differently by threatening signals (fear and anger) from facial or bodily expressions. The amygdala (AMG) was more active for facial than for bodily expressions. Body stimuli triggered higher activation than face stimuli in a number of areas. These were the cuneus, fusiform gyrus (FG), extrastriate body area (EBA), temporoparietal junction (TPJ), superior parietal lobule (SPL), primary somatosensory cortex (SI), as well as the thalamus. Emotion-specific effects were found in TPJ and FG for bodies and faces alike. EBA and superior temporal sulcus (STS) were more activated by threatening bodies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cognitive and Affective Neurosciences Laboratory, Tilburg University, Tilburg, the Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20723605

Citation

Kret, M E., et al. "Similarities and Differences in Perceiving Threat From Dynamic Faces and Bodies. an fMRI Study." NeuroImage, vol. 54, no. 2, 2011, pp. 1755-62.
Kret ME, Pichon S, Grèzes J, et al. Similarities and differences in perceiving threat from dynamic faces and bodies. An fMRI study. Neuroimage. 2011;54(2):1755-62.
Kret, M. E., Pichon, S., Grèzes, J., & de Gelder, B. (2011). Similarities and differences in perceiving threat from dynamic faces and bodies. An fMRI study. NeuroImage, 54(2), 1755-62. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.08.012
Kret ME, et al. Similarities and Differences in Perceiving Threat From Dynamic Faces and Bodies. an fMRI Study. Neuroimage. 2011 Jan 15;54(2):1755-62. PubMed PMID: 20723605.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Similarities and differences in perceiving threat from dynamic faces and bodies. An fMRI study. AU - Kret,M E, AU - Pichon,S, AU - Grèzes,J, AU - de Gelder,B, Y1 - 2010/08/17/ PY - 2010/03/10/received PY - 2010/06/23/revised PY - 2010/08/04/accepted PY - 2010/8/21/entrez PY - 2010/8/21/pubmed PY - 2011/4/6/medline SP - 1755 EP - 62 JF - NeuroImage JO - Neuroimage VL - 54 IS - 2 N2 - Neuroscientific research on the perception of emotional signals has mainly focused on how the brain processes threat signals from photographs of facial expressions. Much less is known about body postures or about the processing of dynamic images. We undertook a systematic comparison of the neurofunctional network dedicated to processing facial and bodily expressions. Two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments investigated whether areas involved in processing social signals are activated differently by threatening signals (fear and anger) from facial or bodily expressions. The amygdala (AMG) was more active for facial than for bodily expressions. Body stimuli triggered higher activation than face stimuli in a number of areas. These were the cuneus, fusiform gyrus (FG), extrastriate body area (EBA), temporoparietal junction (TPJ), superior parietal lobule (SPL), primary somatosensory cortex (SI), as well as the thalamus. Emotion-specific effects were found in TPJ and FG for bodies and faces alike. EBA and superior temporal sulcus (STS) were more activated by threatening bodies. SN - 1095-9572 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20723605/Similarities_and_differences_in_perceiving_threat_from_dynamic_faces_and_bodies__An_fMRI_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1053-8119(10)01079-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -