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Effects of prostate-specific antigen testing on familial prostate cancer risk estimates.
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2010 Sep 08; 102(17):1336-43.JNCI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Family history is a strong risk factor for prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether increased diagnostic activity is related to the incidence of prostate cancer among brothers of men with prostate cancer.

METHODS

Data were from the nationwide population-based Prostate Cancer Database Sweden (PCBaSe Sweden), which includes data from the National Prostate Cancer Register, the Swedish Cancer Register, the Register of the Total Population, the Multi-Generation Register, and the Census database. We investigated the relationship of tumor characteristics, time from diagnosis of the index patient (i.e., prostate cancer patients in the National Prostate Cancer Register for whom at least one brother and their father could be identified), calendar period, geographic factors, and socioeconomic status to standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for prostate cancer among 22 511 brothers of 13 975 index patients in PCBaSe Sweden.

RESULTS

Brothers of index patients with prostate cancer were at increased risk for a diagnosis of prostate cancer (SIR = 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.9 to 3.3). Risk was higher for T1c tumors (SIR = 3.4, 95% CI = 3.2 to 3.8) than for metastatic tumors (SIR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.5 to 2.6), and risk of T1c tumors was especially high during the first year after the diagnosis of the index patient (SIR = 4.3, 95% CI = 3.8 to 4.9), compared with the following years (SIR range = 2.8-3.3), and for brothers of index patients who had a higher socioeconomic status (SIR = 4.2, 95% CI = 3.7 to 4.7), compared with brothers of index patients with lower socioeconomic status (SIR = 2.8, 95% CI = 2.4 to 3.2).

CONCLUSIONS

Increased diagnostic activity among men with a family history of prostate cancer appears to contribute to their increased risk of prostate cancer and to lead to detection bias in epidemiological and genetic studies of familial prostate cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden. ola.bratt@skane.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20724726

Citation

Bratt, Ola, et al. "Effects of Prostate-specific Antigen Testing On Familial Prostate Cancer Risk Estimates." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 102, no. 17, 2010, pp. 1336-43.
Bratt O, Garmo H, Adolfsson J, et al. Effects of prostate-specific antigen testing on familial prostate cancer risk estimates. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2010;102(17):1336-43.
Bratt, O., Garmo, H., Adolfsson, J., Bill-Axelson, A., Holmberg, L., Lambe, M., & Stattin, P. (2010). Effects of prostate-specific antigen testing on familial prostate cancer risk estimates. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 102(17), 1336-43. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djq265
Bratt O, et al. Effects of Prostate-specific Antigen Testing On Familial Prostate Cancer Risk Estimates. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2010 Sep 8;102(17):1336-43. PubMed PMID: 20724726.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of prostate-specific antigen testing on familial prostate cancer risk estimates. AU - Bratt,Ola, AU - Garmo,Hans, AU - Adolfsson,Jan, AU - Bill-Axelson,Anna, AU - Holmberg,Lars, AU - Lambe,Mats, AU - Stattin,Pär, Y1 - 2010/08/19/ PY - 2010/8/21/entrez PY - 2010/8/21/pubmed PY - 2010/9/30/medline SP - 1336 EP - 43 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 102 IS - 17 N2 - BACKGROUND: Family history is a strong risk factor for prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether increased diagnostic activity is related to the incidence of prostate cancer among brothers of men with prostate cancer. METHODS: Data were from the nationwide population-based Prostate Cancer Database Sweden (PCBaSe Sweden), which includes data from the National Prostate Cancer Register, the Swedish Cancer Register, the Register of the Total Population, the Multi-Generation Register, and the Census database. We investigated the relationship of tumor characteristics, time from diagnosis of the index patient (i.e., prostate cancer patients in the National Prostate Cancer Register for whom at least one brother and their father could be identified), calendar period, geographic factors, and socioeconomic status to standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for prostate cancer among 22 511 brothers of 13 975 index patients in PCBaSe Sweden. RESULTS: Brothers of index patients with prostate cancer were at increased risk for a diagnosis of prostate cancer (SIR = 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.9 to 3.3). Risk was higher for T1c tumors (SIR = 3.4, 95% CI = 3.2 to 3.8) than for metastatic tumors (SIR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.5 to 2.6), and risk of T1c tumors was especially high during the first year after the diagnosis of the index patient (SIR = 4.3, 95% CI = 3.8 to 4.9), compared with the following years (SIR range = 2.8-3.3), and for brothers of index patients who had a higher socioeconomic status (SIR = 4.2, 95% CI = 3.7 to 4.7), compared with brothers of index patients with lower socioeconomic status (SIR = 2.8, 95% CI = 2.4 to 3.2). CONCLUSIONS: Increased diagnostic activity among men with a family history of prostate cancer appears to contribute to their increased risk of prostate cancer and to lead to detection bias in epidemiological and genetic studies of familial prostate cancer. SN - 1460-2105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20724726/Effects_of_prostate_specific_antigen_testing_on_familial_prostate_cancer_risk_estimates_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/djq265 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -