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Dysfunctional cognitions, anxiety and depression in irritable bowel syndrome.
J Clin Gastroenterol. 2010 Nov-Dec; 44(10):e236-41.JC

Abstract

GOALS AND BACKGROUND

Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have significantly impaired quality of life (QoL). We investigated the presence of dysfunctional cognitions, anxiety, and depression symptoms and their impact on daily symptoms and QoL in a large IBS cohort.

STUDY

A total of 268 IBS patients (Rome II criteria, age 18 to 65 y) were included. Patients completed a 2-week daily symptom diary. The Short Form-36 was used to score QoL. The 31-items Cognitive Scale for Functional Bowel Disorders (CSFBD) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were used to analyze the psychological factors.

RESULTS

Possible anxiety and depression disorders were present in 30% and 22% of IBS patients, respectively. Patients with anxiety and depression had significantly higher mean symptom scores, impaired QoL, and higher CSFBD scores (P<0.01). Physical and mental QoL were both affected by depression (HADS-D) and dysfunctional cognitions (P<0.01). Only physical QoL, not mental QoL, was affected by referral type (hospital setting vs. community based; P<0.01). Only mental QoL was affected by anxiety (HADS-A) (P<0.01). Dysfunctional cognitions independently of anxiety and depression influenced QoL and IBS symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS

In this IBS cohort, dysfunctional cognitions independently influence physical and mental QoL and symptom severity. Presence of possible anxiety and depression disorders resulted in higher symptoms, lower QoL, and higher CSFBD scores. The results point toward an important role of psychological factors, especially dysfunctional cognitions on QoL and symptom scores in IBS patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands. annemiek.thijssen@intmed.unimaas.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20733511

Citation

Thijssen, Annemieke Y., et al. "Dysfunctional Cognitions, Anxiety and Depression in Irritable Bowel Syndrome." Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, vol. 44, no. 10, 2010, pp. e236-41.
Thijssen AY, Jonkers DM, Leue C, et al. Dysfunctional cognitions, anxiety and depression in irritable bowel syndrome. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2010;44(10):e236-41.
Thijssen, A. Y., Jonkers, D. M., Leue, C., van der Veek, P. P., Vidakovic-Vukic, M., van Rood, Y. R., Clemens, C. H., & Masclee, A. A. (2010). Dysfunctional cognitions, anxiety and depression in irritable bowel syndrome. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, 44(10), e236-41. https://doi.org/10.1097/MCG.0b013e3181eed5d8
Thijssen AY, et al. Dysfunctional Cognitions, Anxiety and Depression in Irritable Bowel Syndrome. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2010 Nov-Dec;44(10):e236-41. PubMed PMID: 20733511.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dysfunctional cognitions, anxiety and depression in irritable bowel syndrome. AU - Thijssen,Annemieke Y, AU - Jonkers,Dorothea M A E, AU - Leue,Carsten, AU - van der Veek,Patrick P J, AU - Vidakovic-Vukic,Michelle, AU - van Rood,Yanda R, AU - Clemens,Cornelis H M, AU - Masclee,Ad A M, PY - 2010/8/25/entrez PY - 2010/8/25/pubmed PY - 2011/2/2/medline SP - e236 EP - 41 JF - Journal of clinical gastroenterology JO - J Clin Gastroenterol VL - 44 IS - 10 N2 - GOALS AND BACKGROUND: Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have significantly impaired quality of life (QoL). We investigated the presence of dysfunctional cognitions, anxiety, and depression symptoms and their impact on daily symptoms and QoL in a large IBS cohort. STUDY: A total of 268 IBS patients (Rome II criteria, age 18 to 65 y) were included. Patients completed a 2-week daily symptom diary. The Short Form-36 was used to score QoL. The 31-items Cognitive Scale for Functional Bowel Disorders (CSFBD) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were used to analyze the psychological factors. RESULTS: Possible anxiety and depression disorders were present in 30% and 22% of IBS patients, respectively. Patients with anxiety and depression had significantly higher mean symptom scores, impaired QoL, and higher CSFBD scores (P<0.01). Physical and mental QoL were both affected by depression (HADS-D) and dysfunctional cognitions (P<0.01). Only physical QoL, not mental QoL, was affected by referral type (hospital setting vs. community based; P<0.01). Only mental QoL was affected by anxiety (HADS-A) (P<0.01). Dysfunctional cognitions independently of anxiety and depression influenced QoL and IBS symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: In this IBS cohort, dysfunctional cognitions independently influence physical and mental QoL and symptom severity. Presence of possible anxiety and depression disorders resulted in higher symptoms, lower QoL, and higher CSFBD scores. The results point toward an important role of psychological factors, especially dysfunctional cognitions on QoL and symptom scores in IBS patients. SN - 1539-2031 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20733511/Dysfunctional_cognitions_anxiety_and_depression_in_irritable_bowel_syndrome_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/MCG.0b013e3181eed5d8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -