Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

High prevalence of low-trauma fracture in chronic pancreatitis.
Am J Gastroenterol. 2010 Dec; 105(12):2680-6.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is associated with risk factors that may negatively impact bone and mineral metabolism. The important clinical end point of osteoporosis is "low-trauma" fracture. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of "low-trauma" fracture in patients with CP, compared with fracture rates in "high-risk" gastrointestinal (GI) illnesses, for which metabolic bone disease screening guidelines are in place.

METHODS

This is a retrospective cohort database study examining patients with CP and "high-risk" GI illnesses seen at a single tertiary care center. Time points ranged between 31 July 1998 and 31 July 2008. The main outcome measure was "low-trauma" fracture prevalence using specific International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification fracture codes.

RESULTS

A total of 3,192 CP patients and 1,461,207 non-CP patients were included in the study. The fracture prevalence (patients with fracture per total patients) was as follows: controls, 1.1% (16,208/1,436,699); Crohn's disease, 3.0% (182/6057); CP, 4.8% (154/3192); cirrhosis, 4.8% (805/16,658); celiac disease, 5.0% (74/1480); and postgastrectomy, 5.4% (17/313). Prevalence for each group was statistically greater than controls (P<0.001). CP fracture prevalence was greater than controls (P<0.001) and Crohn's disease (P<0.001), and comparable with the remaining "high-risk" GI illness groups (P>0.05). The odds of fracture (odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI)) compared with controls, adjusted for age, gender, and race was: CP 2.4 (2.1, 2.9); Crohn's disease 1.7 (1.5, 2.0); gastrectomy 2.5 (1.5, 4.1); cirrhosis 2.6 (2.4, 2.7); and celiac disease 2.7 (2.1, 3.4). The odds of fracture for each disease group were statistically greater than controls (P<0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS

The prevalence of low-trauma fracture in CP patients is comparable with or higher than that of "high-risk" GI illnesses, for which osteoporosis screening guidelines exist.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Endoscopy, Center for Pancreatic Disease, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. atignor@partners.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20736937

Citation

Tignor, April S., et al. "High Prevalence of Low-trauma Fracture in Chronic Pancreatitis." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 105, no. 12, 2010, pp. 2680-6.
Tignor AS, Wu BU, Whitlock TL, et al. High prevalence of low-trauma fracture in chronic pancreatitis. Am J Gastroenterol. 2010;105(12):2680-6.
Tignor, A. S., Wu, B. U., Whitlock, T. L., Lopez, R., Repas, K., Banks, P. A., & Conwell, D. (2010). High prevalence of low-trauma fracture in chronic pancreatitis. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 105(12), 2680-6. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2010.325
Tignor AS, et al. High Prevalence of Low-trauma Fracture in Chronic Pancreatitis. Am J Gastroenterol. 2010;105(12):2680-6. PubMed PMID: 20736937.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High prevalence of low-trauma fracture in chronic pancreatitis. AU - Tignor,April S, AU - Wu,Bechien U, AU - Whitlock,Tom L, AU - Lopez,Rocio, AU - Repas,Kathryn, AU - Banks,Peter A, AU - Conwell,Darwin, Y1 - 2010/08/24/ PY - 2010/8/26/entrez PY - 2010/8/26/pubmed PY - 2011/1/20/medline SP - 2680 EP - 6 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am J Gastroenterol VL - 105 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is associated with risk factors that may negatively impact bone and mineral metabolism. The important clinical end point of osteoporosis is "low-trauma" fracture. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of "low-trauma" fracture in patients with CP, compared with fracture rates in "high-risk" gastrointestinal (GI) illnesses, for which metabolic bone disease screening guidelines are in place. METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort database study examining patients with CP and "high-risk" GI illnesses seen at a single tertiary care center. Time points ranged between 31 July 1998 and 31 July 2008. The main outcome measure was "low-trauma" fracture prevalence using specific International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification fracture codes. RESULTS: A total of 3,192 CP patients and 1,461,207 non-CP patients were included in the study. The fracture prevalence (patients with fracture per total patients) was as follows: controls, 1.1% (16,208/1,436,699); Crohn's disease, 3.0% (182/6057); CP, 4.8% (154/3192); cirrhosis, 4.8% (805/16,658); celiac disease, 5.0% (74/1480); and postgastrectomy, 5.4% (17/313). Prevalence for each group was statistically greater than controls (P<0.001). CP fracture prevalence was greater than controls (P<0.001) and Crohn's disease (P<0.001), and comparable with the remaining "high-risk" GI illness groups (P>0.05). The odds of fracture (odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI)) compared with controls, adjusted for age, gender, and race was: CP 2.4 (2.1, 2.9); Crohn's disease 1.7 (1.5, 2.0); gastrectomy 2.5 (1.5, 4.1); cirrhosis 2.6 (2.4, 2.7); and celiac disease 2.7 (2.1, 3.4). The odds of fracture for each disease group were statistically greater than controls (P<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of low-trauma fracture in CP patients is comparable with or higher than that of "high-risk" GI illnesses, for which osteoporosis screening guidelines exist. SN - 1572-0241 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20736937/High_prevalence_of_low_trauma_fracture_in_chronic_pancreatitis_ L2 - https://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=20736937 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -