Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Research and scholarship of clinical laboratory science faculty members.
Clin Lab Sci 2010; 23(3 Suppl):3-32-8CL

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To describe the research and scholarly productivity of faculty in four-year college and university clinical laboratory science (CLS) programs. To identify hours spent in research, numbers of presentations and publications, and external funding.

DESIGN

In 2008, a national study involving 106 college and university CLS programs was conducted to determine whether faculty were participating in research. A questionnaire, in electronic format, was distributed to 448 faculty members. Data from 2001 to 2008, and from 275 respondents (61% response) representing 93 of 106 (88%) CLS programs were analyzed.

SETTING

The study took place at The Ohio State University with collaboration from the University of Minnesota.

PARTICIPANTS

All CLS faculty within a four-year university or college sponsoring a NAACLS-accredited CLS program were invited to participate.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

To determine whether CLS faculty scholarly activities have been strengthened in the past decade. To quantitate scholarship productivity. To assess faculty perceptions of their employment environments.

RESULTS

Data indicate that faculty who possess earned doctorates have higher levels of research productivity. While 52% of CLS faculty hold doctorates and 45% are tenured, 36% of all CLS faculty members have not published a research paper or abstract since 2001. On the other hand, 19% have published 11 or more times. CLS faculty were also awarded a total of $62 million in external funding, 83% from government sources. Teaching remains a primary responsibility of many faculty members.

CONCLUSIONS

In the past decade, and generally speaking, CLS faculty have made some progress in scholarship including highest degree obtained, publications, presentations, and grantsmanship.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 , USA. Waller.1@osu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20803832

Citation

Waller, Kathy V., et al. "Research and Scholarship of Clinical Laboratory Science Faculty Members." Clinical Laboratory Science : Journal of the American Society for Medical Technology, vol. 23, no. 3 Suppl, 2010, pp. 3-32-8.
Waller KV, Clutter JE, Karni KR. Research and scholarship of clinical laboratory science faculty members. Clin Lab Sci. 2010;23(3 Suppl):3-32-8.
Waller, K. V., Clutter, J. E., & Karni, K. R. (2010). Research and scholarship of clinical laboratory science faculty members. Clinical Laboratory Science : Journal of the American Society for Medical Technology, 23(3 Suppl), pp. 3-32-8.
Waller KV, Clutter JE, Karni KR. Research and Scholarship of Clinical Laboratory Science Faculty Members. Clin Lab Sci. 2010;23(3 Suppl):3-32-8. PubMed PMID: 20803832.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Research and scholarship of clinical laboratory science faculty members. AU - Waller,Kathy V, AU - Clutter,Jill E, AU - Karni,Karen R, PY - 2010/8/31/entrez PY - 2010/8/31/pubmed PY - 2010/9/30/medline SP - 3-32-8 JF - Clinical laboratory science : journal of the American Society for Medical Technology JO - Clin Lab Sci VL - 23 IS - 3 Suppl N2 - OBJECTIVES: To describe the research and scholarly productivity of faculty in four-year college and university clinical laboratory science (CLS) programs. To identify hours spent in research, numbers of presentations and publications, and external funding. DESIGN: In 2008, a national study involving 106 college and university CLS programs was conducted to determine whether faculty were participating in research. A questionnaire, in electronic format, was distributed to 448 faculty members. Data from 2001 to 2008, and from 275 respondents (61% response) representing 93 of 106 (88%) CLS programs were analyzed. SETTING: The study took place at The Ohio State University with collaboration from the University of Minnesota. PARTICIPANTS: All CLS faculty within a four-year university or college sponsoring a NAACLS-accredited CLS program were invited to participate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: To determine whether CLS faculty scholarly activities have been strengthened in the past decade. To quantitate scholarship productivity. To assess faculty perceptions of their employment environments. RESULTS: Data indicate that faculty who possess earned doctorates have higher levels of research productivity. While 52% of CLS faculty hold doctorates and 45% are tenured, 36% of all CLS faculty members have not published a research paper or abstract since 2001. On the other hand, 19% have published 11 or more times. CLS faculty were also awarded a total of $62 million in external funding, 83% from government sources. Teaching remains a primary responsibility of many faculty members. CONCLUSIONS: In the past decade, and generally speaking, CLS faculty have made some progress in scholarship including highest degree obtained, publications, presentations, and grantsmanship. SN - 0894-959X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20803832/Research_and_scholarship_of_clinical_laboratory_science_faculty_members_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/laboratorytests.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -