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Bugs as drugs, Part 1: Insects: the "new" alternative medicine for the 21st century?

Abstract

Insects and insect-derived products have been widely used in folk healing in many parts of the world since ancient times. Promising treatments have at least preliminarily been studied experimentally. Maggots and honey have been used to heal chronic and post-surgical wounds and have been shown to be comparable to conventional dressings in numerous settings. Honey has also been applied to treat burns. Honey has been combined with beeswax in the care of several dermatologic disorders, including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, tinea, pityriasis versicolor, and diaper dermatitis. Royal jelly has been used to treat postmenopausal symptoms. Bee and ant venom have reduced the number of swollen joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Propolis, a hive sealant made by bees, has been utilized to cure aphthous stomatitis. Cantharidin, a derivative of the bodies of blister beetles, has been applied to treat warts and molluscum contagiosum. Combining insects with conventional treatments may provide further benefit.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    The Geriatrics Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA. evan.cherniack@va.gov

    Source

    MeSH

    Animals
    Anti-Infective Agents
    Arthritis, Rheumatoid
    Bee Venoms
    Burns
    Debridement
    Fatty Acids
    Honey
    Hot Flashes
    Humans
    Insecta
    Larva
    Propolis
    Wound Infection
    Wounds and Injuries

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    20806997

    Citation

    Cherniack, E Paul. "Bugs as Drugs, Part 1: Insects: the "new" Alternative Medicine for the 21st Century?" Alternative Medicine Review : a Journal of Clinical Therapeutic, vol. 15, no. 2, 2010, pp. 124-35.
    Cherniack EP. Bugs as drugs, Part 1: Insects: the "new" alternative medicine for the 21st century? Altern Med Rev. 2010;15(2):124-35.
    Cherniack, E. P. (2010). Bugs as drugs, Part 1: Insects: the "new" alternative medicine for the 21st century? Alternative Medicine Review : a Journal of Clinical Therapeutic, 15(2), pp. 124-35.
    Cherniack EP. Bugs as Drugs, Part 1: Insects: the "new" Alternative Medicine for the 21st Century. Altern Med Rev. 2010;15(2):124-35. PubMed PMID: 20806997.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Bugs as drugs, Part 1: Insects: the "new" alternative medicine for the 21st century? A1 - Cherniack,E Paul, PY - 2010/9/3/entrez PY - 2010/9/3/pubmed PY - 2010/10/19/medline SP - 124 EP - 35 JF - Alternative medicine review : a journal of clinical therapeutic JO - Altern Med Rev VL - 15 IS - 2 N2 - Insects and insect-derived products have been widely used in folk healing in many parts of the world since ancient times. Promising treatments have at least preliminarily been studied experimentally. Maggots and honey have been used to heal chronic and post-surgical wounds and have been shown to be comparable to conventional dressings in numerous settings. Honey has also been applied to treat burns. Honey has been combined with beeswax in the care of several dermatologic disorders, including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, tinea, pityriasis versicolor, and diaper dermatitis. Royal jelly has been used to treat postmenopausal symptoms. Bee and ant venom have reduced the number of swollen joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Propolis, a hive sealant made by bees, has been utilized to cure aphthous stomatitis. Cantharidin, a derivative of the bodies of blister beetles, has been applied to treat warts and molluscum contagiosum. Combining insects with conventional treatments may provide further benefit. SN - 1089-5159 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20806997/Bugs_as_drugs_Part_1:_Insects:_the_ L2 - http://archive.foundationalmedicinereview.com/publications/15/2/124.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -