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Lower extremity kinematics of females with patellofemoral pain syndrome while stair stepping.
J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2010; 40(10):625-32JO

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN

Cross-sectional case-control design.

BACKGROUND

Although the etiology of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is not completely understood, there is some evidence to suggest that hip position during weight-bearing activities contributes to the disorder.

OBJECTIVE

To compare the knee and hip motions (and their coordination) during stair stepping in female athletes with and without PFPS.

METHODS

Two groups of female recreational athletes, 1 group with PFPS (n = 10) and a control group without PFPS (n = 10), were tested. All participants ascended and descended stairs (condition) at 2 speeds (self-selected comfortable and taxing [defined as 20% faster than the comfortable speed]), while the knee and hip angles were measured with a magnetic-based kinematic data acquisition system. Angle-angle diagrams were used to examine the relationship between flexion/extension of the knee and flexion/extension, adduction/abduction, and internal/external rotation of the hip. The angle of the knee and the 3 angles of the hip at foot contact on the third step were compared between groups by means of 3-way analyses of variance (ANOVA), with repeated measures on speed and condition.

RESULTS

Group-by-speed interaction for knee angle was significant, with knee flexion being greater for the PFPS group for stair ascent and descent at a comfortable speed. Both the angle-angle diagrams and ANOVA demonstrated greater adduction and internal rotation of the hip in the individuals with PFPS compared to control participants during stair descent.

CONCLUSION

Compared to control participants, females with PFPS descend stairs with the knee in a more flexed position and have the hip in a more adducted and internally rotated position at foot contact during stair stepping at a comfortable speed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Bachelor of Applied Health Sciences (Athletic Therapy) Program, Sheridan College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning, Brampton, ON, Canada. kirsty.mckenzie@sheridanc.on.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20811165

Citation

McKenzie, Kirsty, et al. "Lower Extremity Kinematics of Females With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome While Stair Stepping." The Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, vol. 40, no. 10, 2010, pp. 625-32.
McKenzie K, Galea V, Wessel J, et al. Lower extremity kinematics of females with patellofemoral pain syndrome while stair stepping. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2010;40(10):625-32.
McKenzie, K., Galea, V., Wessel, J., & Pierrynowski, M. (2010). Lower extremity kinematics of females with patellofemoral pain syndrome while stair stepping. The Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 40(10), pp. 625-32. doi:10.2519/jospt.2010.3185.
McKenzie K, et al. Lower Extremity Kinematics of Females With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome While Stair Stepping. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2010;40(10):625-32. PubMed PMID: 20811165.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lower extremity kinematics of females with patellofemoral pain syndrome while stair stepping. AU - McKenzie,Kirsty, AU - Galea,Victoria, AU - Wessel,Jean, AU - Pierrynowski,Michael, PY - 2010/9/3/entrez PY - 2010/9/3/pubmed PY - 2010/12/14/medline SP - 625 EP - 32 JF - The Journal of orthopaedic and sports physical therapy JO - J Orthop Sports Phys Ther VL - 40 IS - 10 N2 - STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional case-control design. BACKGROUND: Although the etiology of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is not completely understood, there is some evidence to suggest that hip position during weight-bearing activities contributes to the disorder. OBJECTIVE: To compare the knee and hip motions (and their coordination) during stair stepping in female athletes with and without PFPS. METHODS: Two groups of female recreational athletes, 1 group with PFPS (n = 10) and a control group without PFPS (n = 10), were tested. All participants ascended and descended stairs (condition) at 2 speeds (self-selected comfortable and taxing [defined as 20% faster than the comfortable speed]), while the knee and hip angles were measured with a magnetic-based kinematic data acquisition system. Angle-angle diagrams were used to examine the relationship between flexion/extension of the knee and flexion/extension, adduction/abduction, and internal/external rotation of the hip. The angle of the knee and the 3 angles of the hip at foot contact on the third step were compared between groups by means of 3-way analyses of variance (ANOVA), with repeated measures on speed and condition. RESULTS: Group-by-speed interaction for knee angle was significant, with knee flexion being greater for the PFPS group for stair ascent and descent at a comfortable speed. Both the angle-angle diagrams and ANOVA demonstrated greater adduction and internal rotation of the hip in the individuals with PFPS compared to control participants during stair descent. CONCLUSION: Compared to control participants, females with PFPS descend stairs with the knee in a more flexed position and have the hip in a more adducted and internally rotated position at foot contact during stair stepping at a comfortable speed. SN - 0190-6011 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20811165/Lower_extremity_kinematics_of_females_with_patellofemoral_pain_syndrome_while_stair_stepping_ L2 - http://www.jospt.org/doi/full/10.2519/jospt.2010.3185?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -