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The shifting balance of diversity among major marine animal groups.
Science. 2010 Sep 03; 329(5996):1191-4.Sci

Abstract

The fossil record demonstrates that each major taxonomic group has a consistent net rate of diversification and a limit to its species richness. It has been thought that long-term changes in the dominance of major taxonomic groups can be predicted from these characteristics. However, new analyses show that diversity limits may rise or fall in response to adaptive radiations or extinctions. These changes are idiosyncratic and occur at different times in each taxa. For example, the end-Permian mass extinction permanently reduced the diversity of important, previously dominant groups such as brachiopods and crinoids. The current global crisis may therefore permanently alter the biosphere's taxonomic composition by changing the rules of evolution.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Paleobiology Database, University of California, 735 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20813951

Citation

Alroy, J. "The Shifting Balance of Diversity Among Major Marine Animal Groups." Science (New York, N.Y.), vol. 329, no. 5996, 2010, pp. 1191-4.
Alroy J. The shifting balance of diversity among major marine animal groups. Science. 2010;329(5996):1191-4.
Alroy, J. (2010). The shifting balance of diversity among major marine animal groups. Science (New York, N.Y.), 329(5996), 1191-4. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1189910
Alroy J. The Shifting Balance of Diversity Among Major Marine Animal Groups. Science. 2010 Sep 3;329(5996):1191-4. PubMed PMID: 20813951.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The shifting balance of diversity among major marine animal groups. A1 - Alroy,J, PY - 2010/9/4/entrez PY - 2010/9/4/pubmed PY - 2010/9/29/medline SP - 1191 EP - 4 JF - Science (New York, N.Y.) JO - Science VL - 329 IS - 5996 N2 - The fossil record demonstrates that each major taxonomic group has a consistent net rate of diversification and a limit to its species richness. It has been thought that long-term changes in the dominance of major taxonomic groups can be predicted from these characteristics. However, new analyses show that diversity limits may rise or fall in response to adaptive radiations or extinctions. These changes are idiosyncratic and occur at different times in each taxa. For example, the end-Permian mass extinction permanently reduced the diversity of important, previously dominant groups such as brachiopods and crinoids. The current global crisis may therefore permanently alter the biosphere's taxonomic composition by changing the rules of evolution. SN - 1095-9203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20813951/The_shifting_balance_of_diversity_among_major_marine_animal_groups_ L2 - http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=20813951 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -