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Dietary and physical activity adaptations to alternate day modified fasting: implications for optimal weight loss.
Nutr J. 2010 Sep 03; 9:35.NJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Alternate day modified fasting (ADMF) is an effective strategy for weight loss in obese adults.

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to examine the dietary and physical activity adaptations that occur during short-term ADMF, and to determine how these modulations affect rate of weight loss.

METHODS

Sixteen obese subjects (12 women/4 men) completed a 10-week trial consisting of 3 phases: 1) 2-week control phase, 2) 4-week ADMF controlled feeding phase, and 3) 4-week ADMF self-selected feeding phase.

RESULTS

Body weight decreased (P < 0.001) by 5.6 ± 1.0 kg post-treatment. Energy intake on the fast day was 26 ± 3% of baseline needs (501 ± 28 kcal/d). No hyperphagic response occurred on the feed day (95 ± 6% of baseline needs consumed, 1801 ± 226 kcal/d). Daily energy restriction (37 ± 7%) was correlated to rate of weight loss (r = 0.42, P = 0.01). Dietary fat intake decreased (36% to 33% of kcal, P < 0.05) with dietary counseling, and was related to rate of weight loss (r = 0.38, P = 0.03). Hunger on the fast day decreased (P < 0.05) by week 2, and remained low. Habitual physical activity was maintained throughout the study (fast day: 6416 ± 851 steps/d; feed day: 6569 ± 910 steps/d).

CONCLUSION

These findings indicate that obese subjects quickly adapt to ADMF, and that changes in energy/macronutrient intake, hunger, and maintenance of physical activity play a role in influencing rate of weight loss by ADMF.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, IL, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20815899

Citation

Klempel, Monica C., et al. "Dietary and Physical Activity Adaptations to Alternate Day Modified Fasting: Implications for Optimal Weight Loss." Nutrition Journal, vol. 9, 2010, p. 35.
Klempel MC, Bhutani S, Fitzgibbon M, et al. Dietary and physical activity adaptations to alternate day modified fasting: implications for optimal weight loss. Nutr J. 2010;9:35.
Klempel, M. C., Bhutani, S., Fitzgibbon, M., Freels, S., & Varady, K. A. (2010). Dietary and physical activity adaptations to alternate day modified fasting: implications for optimal weight loss. Nutrition Journal, 9, 35. https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-9-35
Klempel MC, et al. Dietary and Physical Activity Adaptations to Alternate Day Modified Fasting: Implications for Optimal Weight Loss. Nutr J. 2010 Sep 3;9:35. PubMed PMID: 20815899.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary and physical activity adaptations to alternate day modified fasting: implications for optimal weight loss. AU - Klempel,Monica C, AU - Bhutani,Surabhi, AU - Fitzgibbon,Marian, AU - Freels,Sally, AU - Varady,Krista A, Y1 - 2010/09/03/ PY - 2010/04/29/received PY - 2010/09/03/accepted PY - 2010/9/7/entrez PY - 2010/9/8/pubmed PY - 2010/10/21/medline SP - 35 EP - 35 JF - Nutrition journal JO - Nutr J VL - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Alternate day modified fasting (ADMF) is an effective strategy for weight loss in obese adults. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the dietary and physical activity adaptations that occur during short-term ADMF, and to determine how these modulations affect rate of weight loss. METHODS: Sixteen obese subjects (12 women/4 men) completed a 10-week trial consisting of 3 phases: 1) 2-week control phase, 2) 4-week ADMF controlled feeding phase, and 3) 4-week ADMF self-selected feeding phase. RESULTS: Body weight decreased (P < 0.001) by 5.6 ± 1.0 kg post-treatment. Energy intake on the fast day was 26 ± 3% of baseline needs (501 ± 28 kcal/d). No hyperphagic response occurred on the feed day (95 ± 6% of baseline needs consumed, 1801 ± 226 kcal/d). Daily energy restriction (37 ± 7%) was correlated to rate of weight loss (r = 0.42, P = 0.01). Dietary fat intake decreased (36% to 33% of kcal, P < 0.05) with dietary counseling, and was related to rate of weight loss (r = 0.38, P = 0.03). Hunger on the fast day decreased (P < 0.05) by week 2, and remained low. Habitual physical activity was maintained throughout the study (fast day: 6416 ± 851 steps/d; feed day: 6569 ± 910 steps/d). CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that obese subjects quickly adapt to ADMF, and that changes in energy/macronutrient intake, hunger, and maintenance of physical activity play a role in influencing rate of weight loss by ADMF. SN - 1475-2891 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20815899/Dietary_and_physical_activity_adaptations_to_alternate_day_modified_fasting:_implications_for_optimal_weight_loss_ L2 - https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2891-9-35 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -