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Clinical genetics of hereditary colorectal cancer.
Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2010; 24(5):837-59HO

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common disease, and approximately 25% of patients have a familial component. High-penetrance singlegene germline mutations conferring a true hereditary susceptibility account for around 5% to 6% of all cases. Lynch syndrome is the most common hereditary form of colorectal cancer. Much of the hereditary component in the remaining familial cases of CRC is likely polygenic, and many of the genetic changes involved are as yet unidentified. This article addresses the most clinically important CRC genetic syndromes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinical Genetics, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20816577

Citation

Power, Derek G., et al. "Clinical Genetics of Hereditary Colorectal Cancer." Hematology/oncology Clinics of North America, vol. 24, no. 5, 2010, pp. 837-59.
Power DG, Gloglowski E, Lipkin SM. Clinical genetics of hereditary colorectal cancer. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am. 2010;24(5):837-59.
Power, D. G., Gloglowski, E., & Lipkin, S. M. (2010). Clinical genetics of hereditary colorectal cancer. Hematology/oncology Clinics of North America, 24(5), pp. 837-59. doi:10.1016/j.hoc.2010.06.006.
Power DG, Gloglowski E, Lipkin SM. Clinical Genetics of Hereditary Colorectal Cancer. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am. 2010;24(5):837-59. PubMed PMID: 20816577.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical genetics of hereditary colorectal cancer. AU - Power,Derek G, AU - Gloglowski,Emily, AU - Lipkin,Steven M, PY - 2010/9/7/entrez PY - 2010/9/8/pubmed PY - 2011/1/22/medline SP - 837 EP - 59 JF - Hematology/oncology clinics of North America JO - Hematol. Oncol. Clin. North Am. VL - 24 IS - 5 N2 - Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common disease, and approximately 25% of patients have a familial component. High-penetrance singlegene germline mutations conferring a true hereditary susceptibility account for around 5% to 6% of all cases. Lynch syndrome is the most common hereditary form of colorectal cancer. Much of the hereditary component in the remaining familial cases of CRC is likely polygenic, and many of the genetic changes involved are as yet unidentified. This article addresses the most clinically important CRC genetic syndromes. SN - 1558-1977 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20816577/Clinical_genetics_of_hereditary_colorectal_cancer_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0889-8588(10)00095-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -