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Distribution and dynamics of Bemisia tabaci invasive biotypes in central China.
Bull Entomol Res. 2011 Feb; 101(1):81-8.BE

Abstract

The tobacco whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), causes severe crop losses in many agricultural systems. The worst of these losses are often associated with the invasion and establishment of specific whitefly biotypes. In a comprehensive survey of biotypes present in central China between 2005 and 2007, we obtained 191 samples of B. tabaci from 19 districts in Hubei province and its surrounds. Biotypes were identified by RAPD-PCR and by sequencing the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene (mtCO1). We determined that these central Chinese haplotypes included the world's two most invasive B. tabaci biotypes (B and Q) and two indigenous biotypes (ZHJ1 and ZHJ3). The B biotype shared >99.7% identity with other Chinese B biotypes and the Q biotype shared >99.5% of its identity with Q samples from the Mediterranean, USA, Africa and East Asia. By 2007, the Q biotype was dominant over much of Hubei province and appeared to be supplanting all other biotypes, although both the invasive and indigenous biotypes existed in sympatry in some regions. The invasion and rapid establishment of the Q biotype in China mirrors events elsewhere in the world, and we suggest that this is a consequence of its reproductive isolation, its polyphagous nature and its broad-spectrum resistance to insecticides. Its dominance has severe implications for the sustainability of some insecticide groups and for the production of a number of crops.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Institute of Urban Horticultural Pests, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20822556

Citation

Rao, Q, et al. "Distribution and Dynamics of Bemisia Tabaci Invasive Biotypes in Central China." Bulletin of Entomological Research, vol. 101, no. 1, 2011, pp. 81-8.
Rao Q, Luo C, Zhang H, et al. Distribution and dynamics of Bemisia tabaci invasive biotypes in central China. Bull Entomol Res. 2011;101(1):81-8.
Rao, Q., Luo, C., Zhang, H., Guo, X., & Devine, G. J. (2011). Distribution and dynamics of Bemisia tabaci invasive biotypes in central China. Bulletin of Entomological Research, 101(1), 81-8. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007485310000428
Rao Q, et al. Distribution and Dynamics of Bemisia Tabaci Invasive Biotypes in Central China. Bull Entomol Res. 2011;101(1):81-8. PubMed PMID: 20822556.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Distribution and dynamics of Bemisia tabaci invasive biotypes in central China. AU - Rao,Q, AU - Luo,C, AU - Zhang,H, AU - Guo,X, AU - Devine,G J, Y1 - 2010/09/08/ PY - 2010/9/9/entrez PY - 2010/9/9/pubmed PY - 2011/4/16/medline SP - 81 EP - 8 JF - Bulletin of entomological research JO - Bull Entomol Res VL - 101 IS - 1 N2 - The tobacco whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), causes severe crop losses in many agricultural systems. The worst of these losses are often associated with the invasion and establishment of specific whitefly biotypes. In a comprehensive survey of biotypes present in central China between 2005 and 2007, we obtained 191 samples of B. tabaci from 19 districts in Hubei province and its surrounds. Biotypes were identified by RAPD-PCR and by sequencing the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene (mtCO1). We determined that these central Chinese haplotypes included the world's two most invasive B. tabaci biotypes (B and Q) and two indigenous biotypes (ZHJ1 and ZHJ3). The B biotype shared >99.7% identity with other Chinese B biotypes and the Q biotype shared >99.5% of its identity with Q samples from the Mediterranean, USA, Africa and East Asia. By 2007, the Q biotype was dominant over much of Hubei province and appeared to be supplanting all other biotypes, although both the invasive and indigenous biotypes existed in sympatry in some regions. The invasion and rapid establishment of the Q biotype in China mirrors events elsewhere in the world, and we suggest that this is a consequence of its reproductive isolation, its polyphagous nature and its broad-spectrum resistance to insecticides. Its dominance has severe implications for the sustainability of some insecticide groups and for the production of a number of crops. SN - 1475-2670 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20822556/Distribution_and_dynamics_of_Bemisia_tabaci_invasive_biotypes_in_central_China_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007485310000428/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -