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Racial and ethnic differences in weight management behavior by weight perception status.
Ethn Dis. 2010 Summer; 20(3):244-50.ED

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine racial/ethnic differences in the relationship between weight perception and weight management behaviors among overweight and obese adults.

PARTICIPANTS

The study examined a nationally representative sample of 11,319 non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black and Mexican American overweight and obese adults aged > or = 20 years from the 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

DESIGN

Body mass index (BMI, defined as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) was used to categorize overweight (25 < or = BMI < 30) and obesity (BMI > or = 30). Measured height and weight were used to calculate BMI. Subjects reported self-perception of weight status (correct perception and misperception) and weight management behaviors over the previous 12 months (trying to lose weight, trying not to gain weight, and having a desired weight goal). Weight perception stratified logistic regression was used to model odds of weight management behavior by race/ethnicity.

RESULTS

Among overweight and obese non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, and Mexican American adults, correct weight perception was positively associated with weight management behavior. In multiple logistic regression models, overweight non-Hispanic Blacks with a weight misperception were less likely to have tried to lose weight (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = .7; 95% confidence interval [Cl] = .5,1.0) or to have tried not to gain weight (aOR = .7; 95% CI = .5,1.0) compared to overweight non-Hispanic Whites with a weight misperception. Among the obese with a misperception, non-Hispanic Blacks were less likely to desire to weigh less compared to non-Hispanic Whites (aOR = .5; 95% CI = .3,.9).

CONCLUSIONS

Weight perception was associated with weight management behaviors, and this relationship varied by race/ethnicity. Weight perception may need to be addressed among overweight and obese individuals to increase appropriate weight management behaviors, particularly among minority communities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, MD, USA. rrdorsey@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20828097

Citation

Dorsey, Rashida R., et al. "Racial and Ethnic Differences in Weight Management Behavior By Weight Perception Status." Ethnicity & Disease, vol. 20, no. 3, 2010, pp. 244-50.
Dorsey RR, Eberhardt MS, Ogden CL. Racial and ethnic differences in weight management behavior by weight perception status. Ethn Dis. 2010;20(3):244-50.
Dorsey, R. R., Eberhardt, M. S., & Ogden, C. L. (2010). Racial and ethnic differences in weight management behavior by weight perception status. Ethnicity & Disease, 20(3), 244-50.
Dorsey RR, Eberhardt MS, Ogden CL. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Weight Management Behavior By Weight Perception Status. Ethn Dis. 2010;20(3):244-50. PubMed PMID: 20828097.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial and ethnic differences in weight management behavior by weight perception status. AU - Dorsey,Rashida R, AU - Eberhardt,Mark S, AU - Ogden,Cynthia L, PY - 2010/9/11/entrez PY - 2010/9/11/pubmed PY - 2010/11/3/medline SP - 244 EP - 50 JF - Ethnicity & disease JO - Ethn Dis VL - 20 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine racial/ethnic differences in the relationship between weight perception and weight management behaviors among overweight and obese adults. PARTICIPANTS: The study examined a nationally representative sample of 11,319 non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black and Mexican American overweight and obese adults aged > or = 20 years from the 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. DESIGN: Body mass index (BMI, defined as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) was used to categorize overweight (25 < or = BMI < 30) and obesity (BMI > or = 30). Measured height and weight were used to calculate BMI. Subjects reported self-perception of weight status (correct perception and misperception) and weight management behaviors over the previous 12 months (trying to lose weight, trying not to gain weight, and having a desired weight goal). Weight perception stratified logistic regression was used to model odds of weight management behavior by race/ethnicity. RESULTS: Among overweight and obese non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, and Mexican American adults, correct weight perception was positively associated with weight management behavior. In multiple logistic regression models, overweight non-Hispanic Blacks with a weight misperception were less likely to have tried to lose weight (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = .7; 95% confidence interval [Cl] = .5,1.0) or to have tried not to gain weight (aOR = .7; 95% CI = .5,1.0) compared to overweight non-Hispanic Whites with a weight misperception. Among the obese with a misperception, non-Hispanic Blacks were less likely to desire to weigh less compared to non-Hispanic Whites (aOR = .5; 95% CI = .3,.9). CONCLUSIONS: Weight perception was associated with weight management behaviors, and this relationship varied by race/ethnicity. Weight perception may need to be addressed among overweight and obese individuals to increase appropriate weight management behaviors, particularly among minority communities. SN - 1049-510X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20828097/Racial_and_ethnic_differences_in_weight_management_behavior_by_weight_perception_status_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/blackandafricanamericanhealth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -