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Geographical and climatic dependencies of green tea (Camellia sinensis) metabolites: a (1)H NMR-based metabolomics study.
J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Oct 13; 58(19):10582-9.JA

Abstract

The effects of climatic conditions on green tea metabolites in three different growing areas of Jeju Island, South Korea, were investigated through global metabolite profiling by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Pattern recognition methods, such as principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection on latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), revealed clear discriminations of green teas from the three different growing areas. Variations of theanine, isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, threonine, glutamine, quinic acid, glucose, epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and caffeine levels were responsible for the discriminations. Green teas grown in an area with high temperature, long sun exposure time, and high rainfall had higher levels of theanine but lower levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, EC, EGC, EGCG, and caffeine than those grown in areas with relatively low temperature, short sun exposure time, and low rainfall. These results indicate that high temperature, long sun exposure, and high preciptation stimulate theanine synthesis in green tea during the spring season. This study highlights how metabolomics coupled with multivariate statistical analysis can illuminate the metabolic characteristics of green tea associated with climatic variables, thereby allowing for the assessment of quality strategy in green tea production.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701, Republic of Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20828156

Citation

Lee, Jang-Eun, et al. "Geographical and Climatic Dependencies of Green Tea (Camellia Sinensis) Metabolites: a (1)H NMR-based Metabolomics Study." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 58, no. 19, 2010, pp. 10582-9.
Lee JE, Lee BJ, Chung JO, et al. Geographical and climatic dependencies of green tea (Camellia sinensis) metabolites: a (1)H NMR-based metabolomics study. J Agric Food Chem. 2010;58(19):10582-9.
Lee, J. E., Lee, B. J., Chung, J. O., Hwang, J. A., Lee, S. J., Lee, C. H., & Hong, Y. S. (2010). Geographical and climatic dependencies of green tea (Camellia sinensis) metabolites: a (1)H NMR-based metabolomics study. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 58(19), 10582-9. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf102415m
Lee JE, et al. Geographical and Climatic Dependencies of Green Tea (Camellia Sinensis) Metabolites: a (1)H NMR-based Metabolomics Study. J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Oct 13;58(19):10582-9. PubMed PMID: 20828156.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Geographical and climatic dependencies of green tea (Camellia sinensis) metabolites: a (1)H NMR-based metabolomics study. AU - Lee,Jang-Eun, AU - Lee,Bum-Jin, AU - Chung,Jin-Oh, AU - Hwang,Jeong-Ah, AU - Lee,Sang-Jun, AU - Lee,Cherl-Ho, AU - Hong,Young-Shick, PY - 2010/9/11/entrez PY - 2010/9/11/pubmed PY - 2011/2/4/medline SP - 10582 EP - 9 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 58 IS - 19 N2 - The effects of climatic conditions on green tea metabolites in three different growing areas of Jeju Island, South Korea, were investigated through global metabolite profiling by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Pattern recognition methods, such as principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection on latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), revealed clear discriminations of green teas from the three different growing areas. Variations of theanine, isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, threonine, glutamine, quinic acid, glucose, epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and caffeine levels were responsible for the discriminations. Green teas grown in an area with high temperature, long sun exposure time, and high rainfall had higher levels of theanine but lower levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, EC, EGC, EGCG, and caffeine than those grown in areas with relatively low temperature, short sun exposure time, and low rainfall. These results indicate that high temperature, long sun exposure, and high preciptation stimulate theanine synthesis in green tea during the spring season. This study highlights how metabolomics coupled with multivariate statistical analysis can illuminate the metabolic characteristics of green tea associated with climatic variables, thereby allowing for the assessment of quality strategy in green tea production. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20828156/Geographical_and_climatic_dependencies_of_green_tea__Camellia_sinensis__metabolites:_a__1_H_NMR_based_metabolomics_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/jf102415m DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -