Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effect of cognitive load on speech prosody in aviation: Evidence from military simulator flights.
Appl Ergon. 2011 Jan; 42(2):348-57.AE

Abstract

Mental overload directly affects safety in aviation and needs to be alleviated. Speech recordings are obtained non-invasively and as such are feasible for monitoring cognitive load. We recorded speech of 13 military pilots while they were performing a simulator task. Three types of cognitive load (load on situation awareness, information processing and decision making) were rated by a flight instructor separately for each flight phase and participant. As a function of increased cognitive load, the mean utterance-level fundamental frequency (F0) increased, on average, by 7 Hz and the mean vocal intensity increased by 1 dB. In the most intensive simulator flight phases, mean F0 increased by 12 Hz and mean intensity, by 1.5 dB. At the same time, the mean F0 range decreased by 5 Hz, on average. Our results showed that prosodic features of speech can be used to monitor speaker state and support pilot training in a simulator environment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Clinical Medicine/Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Finland. kerttu.huttunen@oulu.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20832770

Citation

Huttunen, Kerttu, et al. "Effect of Cognitive Load On Speech Prosody in Aviation: Evidence From Military Simulator Flights." Applied Ergonomics, vol. 42, no. 2, 2011, pp. 348-57.
Huttunen K, Keränen H, Väyrynen E, et al. Effect of cognitive load on speech prosody in aviation: Evidence from military simulator flights. Appl Ergon. 2011;42(2):348-57.
Huttunen, K., Keränen, H., Väyrynen, E., Pääkkönen, R., & Leino, T. (2011). Effect of cognitive load on speech prosody in aviation: Evidence from military simulator flights. Applied Ergonomics, 42(2), 348-57. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2010.08.005
Huttunen K, et al. Effect of Cognitive Load On Speech Prosody in Aviation: Evidence From Military Simulator Flights. Appl Ergon. 2011;42(2):348-57. PubMed PMID: 20832770.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of cognitive load on speech prosody in aviation: Evidence from military simulator flights. AU - Huttunen,Kerttu, AU - Keränen,Heikki, AU - Väyrynen,Eero, AU - Pääkkönen,Rauno, AU - Leino,Tuomo, Y1 - 2010/09/15/ PY - 2010/04/05/received PY - 2010/07/21/revised PY - 2010/08/17/accepted PY - 2010/9/14/entrez PY - 2010/9/14/pubmed PY - 2011/3/29/medline SP - 348 EP - 57 JF - Applied ergonomics JO - Appl Ergon VL - 42 IS - 2 N2 - Mental overload directly affects safety in aviation and needs to be alleviated. Speech recordings are obtained non-invasively and as such are feasible for monitoring cognitive load. We recorded speech of 13 military pilots while they were performing a simulator task. Three types of cognitive load (load on situation awareness, information processing and decision making) were rated by a flight instructor separately for each flight phase and participant. As a function of increased cognitive load, the mean utterance-level fundamental frequency (F0) increased, on average, by 7 Hz and the mean vocal intensity increased by 1 dB. In the most intensive simulator flight phases, mean F0 increased by 12 Hz and mean intensity, by 1.5 dB. At the same time, the mean F0 range decreased by 5 Hz, on average. Our results showed that prosodic features of speech can be used to monitor speaker state and support pilot training in a simulator environment. SN - 1872-9126 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20832770/Effect_of_cognitive_load_on_speech_prosody_in_aviation:_Evidence_from_military_simulator_flights_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -