Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a challenge for pediatricians.
Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Oct; 34(10):1451-67.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of pediatric liver disease. Its prevalence is related to the growing epidemic in childhood obesity during the past decades. At present, NAFLD and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are increasingly recognized worldwide. In spite of alarming trend in the epidemiology in pediatric field and growing risk of end stage liver disease, there is no significant advance in its diagnosis and treatment.

AIM

To provide a detailed review for diagnosis and management of NAFLD and NASH.

METHODS

By using Pubmed to find review articles and relevant research.

RESULTS

The prevalence ranges from at least 3% in children overall to about 50% in obese children. The noninvasive biomarkers can be used to identify NAFLD/NASH patients. Diagnostic criteria based on biochemical and immunological indicators in the high-risk group of children could prevent about half of cases from receiving an invasive test. The pharmacological and surgical interventions have shown a growing role in pediatric NAFLD. Novel treatment modalities, such as probiotics, have hardly been studied.

CONCLUSION

Early diagnosis by using noninvasive screening methods in high-risk groups is the most effective strategy against the NAFLD. The biology of early growth and development, including hepatic metabolism, may hold the key to pediatric NAFLD. Prevention of overweight children and childhood obesity is undoubtedly the best strategy for treating NAFLD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pediatric Nutrition and Prevention, Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. kurt.widhalm@meduniwien.ac.atNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20838401

Citation

Widhalm, K, and E Ghods. "Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: a Challenge for Pediatricians." International Journal of Obesity (2005), vol. 34, no. 10, 2010, pp. 1451-67.
Widhalm K, Ghods E. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a challenge for pediatricians. Int J Obes (Lond). 2010;34(10):1451-67.
Widhalm, K., & Ghods, E. (2010). Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a challenge for pediatricians. International Journal of Obesity (2005), 34(10), 1451-67. https://doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2010.185
Widhalm K, Ghods E. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: a Challenge for Pediatricians. Int J Obes (Lond). 2010;34(10):1451-67. PubMed PMID: 20838401.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a challenge for pediatricians. AU - Widhalm,K, AU - Ghods,E, Y1 - 2010/09/14/ PY - 2010/9/15/entrez PY - 2010/9/15/pubmed PY - 2011/3/11/medline SP - 1451 EP - 67 JF - International journal of obesity (2005) JO - Int J Obes (Lond) VL - 34 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of pediatric liver disease. Its prevalence is related to the growing epidemic in childhood obesity during the past decades. At present, NAFLD and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are increasingly recognized worldwide. In spite of alarming trend in the epidemiology in pediatric field and growing risk of end stage liver disease, there is no significant advance in its diagnosis and treatment. AIM: To provide a detailed review for diagnosis and management of NAFLD and NASH. METHODS: By using Pubmed to find review articles and relevant research. RESULTS: The prevalence ranges from at least 3% in children overall to about 50% in obese children. The noninvasive biomarkers can be used to identify NAFLD/NASH patients. Diagnostic criteria based on biochemical and immunological indicators in the high-risk group of children could prevent about half of cases from receiving an invasive test. The pharmacological and surgical interventions have shown a growing role in pediatric NAFLD. Novel treatment modalities, such as probiotics, have hardly been studied. CONCLUSION: Early diagnosis by using noninvasive screening methods in high-risk groups is the most effective strategy against the NAFLD. The biology of early growth and development, including hepatic metabolism, may hold the key to pediatric NAFLD. Prevention of overweight children and childhood obesity is undoubtedly the best strategy for treating NAFLD. SN - 1476-5497 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20838401/Nonalcoholic_fatty_liver_disease:_a_challenge_for_pediatricians_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2010.185 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -