Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The acute effects of performing drop jumps of different intensities on concentric squat strength.
J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2010 Sep; 50(3):254-61.JS

Abstract

AIM

To investigate the acute effects of performing drop jumps of different intensities on subsequent squat 1 repetition maximum (1RM).

METHODS

14 participants with strength training experience completed two familiarization sessions to become accustomed with the testing procedures and 1RM-like loads. Following this, four different 1RM testing sessions were completed. In each testing session subjects performed a 5-min bicycle warm-up followed by a series of sets with increasingly heavier loads until squat 1RM was achieved. During the first of these four sessions squat 1RM was assessed without the addition of drop jumps to the 1RM warm-up routine, thus was designated the control (CTRL) condition. In the final 3 testing sessions, two drop jumps from either 30 (DJ30), 45 (DJ45), or 60 (DJ60) cm were added to the warm-up routine that preceded squat 1RM assessment. EMG activity of the vastus lateralis was also monitored during 1RM testing.

RESULTS

Squat 1RM without prior plyometric activity was 128.4±36.1 kg. Following DJ30, DJ45, and DJ60 squat 1RM equaled 130.4±36.4 kg, 130.9±38.3 kg, 131.0±38.9 kg, respectively. A repeated measures ANOVA uncovered a significant main effect of warm-up condition (P=0.021). Post hoc analysis revealed that differences in the 1RM values were only significant between DJ30 and CTRL (P=0.002). No significant differences in muscle activation of the vastus lateralis were noted between the conditions.

CONCLUSION

These findings indicate lower body strength in individuals familiar with resistance training can be acutely enhanced when preceded by a warm-up incorporating a low volume of low intensity drop jumps.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, University of the Fraser Valley, Abbotsford, BC, Canada. jason.brandenburg@ufv.caNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20842084

Citation

Brandenburg, J, and A Czajka. "The Acute Effects of Performing Drop Jumps of Different Intensities On Concentric Squat Strength." The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, vol. 50, no. 3, 2010, pp. 254-61.
Brandenburg J, Czajka A. The acute effects of performing drop jumps of different intensities on concentric squat strength. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2010;50(3):254-61.
Brandenburg, J., & Czajka, A. (2010). The acute effects of performing drop jumps of different intensities on concentric squat strength. The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 50(3), 254-61.
Brandenburg J, Czajka A. The Acute Effects of Performing Drop Jumps of Different Intensities On Concentric Squat Strength. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2010;50(3):254-61. PubMed PMID: 20842084.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The acute effects of performing drop jumps of different intensities on concentric squat strength. AU - Brandenburg,J, AU - Czajka,A, PY - 2010/9/16/entrez PY - 2010/9/16/pubmed PY - 2011/4/22/medline SP - 254 EP - 61 JF - The Journal of sports medicine and physical fitness JO - J Sports Med Phys Fitness VL - 50 IS - 3 N2 - AIM: To investigate the acute effects of performing drop jumps of different intensities on subsequent squat 1 repetition maximum (1RM). METHODS: 14 participants with strength training experience completed two familiarization sessions to become accustomed with the testing procedures and 1RM-like loads. Following this, four different 1RM testing sessions were completed. In each testing session subjects performed a 5-min bicycle warm-up followed by a series of sets with increasingly heavier loads until squat 1RM was achieved. During the first of these four sessions squat 1RM was assessed without the addition of drop jumps to the 1RM warm-up routine, thus was designated the control (CTRL) condition. In the final 3 testing sessions, two drop jumps from either 30 (DJ30), 45 (DJ45), or 60 (DJ60) cm were added to the warm-up routine that preceded squat 1RM assessment. EMG activity of the vastus lateralis was also monitored during 1RM testing. RESULTS: Squat 1RM without prior plyometric activity was 128.4±36.1 kg. Following DJ30, DJ45, and DJ60 squat 1RM equaled 130.4±36.4 kg, 130.9±38.3 kg, 131.0±38.9 kg, respectively. A repeated measures ANOVA uncovered a significant main effect of warm-up condition (P=0.021). Post hoc analysis revealed that differences in the 1RM values were only significant between DJ30 and CTRL (P=0.002). No significant differences in muscle activation of the vastus lateralis were noted between the conditions. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate lower body strength in individuals familiar with resistance training can be acutely enhanced when preceded by a warm-up incorporating a low volume of low intensity drop jumps. SN - 0022-4707 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20842084/The_acute_effects_of_performing_drop_jumps_of_different_intensities_on_concentric_squat_strength_ L2 - http://www.minervamedica.it/index2.t?show=R40Y2010N03A0254 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -