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CNS infection in childhood does not confer risk for later schizophrenia: a case-control study.
Schizophr Res. 2010 Dec; 124(1-3):231-5.SR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The hypothesized role of CNS infection during childhood in increasing later risk of brain malfunction manifested as schizophrenia has been supported by some but not other studies. We sought to contribute to this debate by linking data on persons who had been hospitalized for meningitis as children, with a National Psychiatric Hospitalization Registry.

METHOD

Data were gathered on 3599 persons who had been hospitalized for a CNS infection before the age of 16, and 6371 controls who had been hospitalized as children for gastroenteritis. Both groups were followed for later hospitalization for schizophrenia between 1970 and 2007 using the Israeli National Psychiatric Hospitalization Case Registry. Data were analyzed using Cox regression analyses.

RESULTS

The mean age of the subjects at hospitalization for a CNS infection was 3.4 ± 3.6 years, mean age of the subjects at follow up was 29.3 ± 6.0 years. Compared to controls, hospitalization for any CNS infection during childhood was not associated with an increased risk of later hospitalization for schizophrenia, adjusted HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.5-1.32.

CONCLUSIONS

Overall there was no significant association between childhood CNS infection and schizophrenia. These data do not support the presence of an infectious etiology of schizophrenia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel. mweiser@netvision.net.ilNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20846826

Citation

Weiser, Mark, et al. "CNS Infection in Childhood Does Not Confer Risk for Later Schizophrenia: a Case-control Study." Schizophrenia Research, vol. 124, no. 1-3, 2010, pp. 231-5.
Weiser M, Werbeloff N, Levine A, et al. CNS infection in childhood does not confer risk for later schizophrenia: a case-control study. Schizophr Res. 2010;124(1-3):231-5.
Weiser, M., Werbeloff, N., Levine, A., Livni, G., Schreiber, S., Halperin, D., Yoffe, R., & Davidson, M. (2010). CNS infection in childhood does not confer risk for later schizophrenia: a case-control study. Schizophrenia Research, 124(1-3), 231-5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2010.08.025
Weiser M, et al. CNS Infection in Childhood Does Not Confer Risk for Later Schizophrenia: a Case-control Study. Schizophr Res. 2010;124(1-3):231-5. PubMed PMID: 20846826.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - CNS infection in childhood does not confer risk for later schizophrenia: a case-control study. AU - Weiser,Mark, AU - Werbeloff,Nomi, AU - Levine,Arie, AU - Livni,Gilat, AU - Schreiber,Shaul, AU - Halperin,Demian, AU - Yoffe,Rinat, AU - Davidson,Michael, Y1 - 2010/09/16/ PY - 2010/07/05/received PY - 2010/08/02/revised PY - 2010/08/14/accepted PY - 2010/9/18/entrez PY - 2010/9/18/pubmed PY - 2011/4/20/medline SP - 231 EP - 5 JF - Schizophrenia research JO - Schizophr Res VL - 124 IS - 1-3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The hypothesized role of CNS infection during childhood in increasing later risk of brain malfunction manifested as schizophrenia has been supported by some but not other studies. We sought to contribute to this debate by linking data on persons who had been hospitalized for meningitis as children, with a National Psychiatric Hospitalization Registry. METHOD: Data were gathered on 3599 persons who had been hospitalized for a CNS infection before the age of 16, and 6371 controls who had been hospitalized as children for gastroenteritis. Both groups were followed for later hospitalization for schizophrenia between 1970 and 2007 using the Israeli National Psychiatric Hospitalization Case Registry. Data were analyzed using Cox regression analyses. RESULTS: The mean age of the subjects at hospitalization for a CNS infection was 3.4 ± 3.6 years, mean age of the subjects at follow up was 29.3 ± 6.0 years. Compared to controls, hospitalization for any CNS infection during childhood was not associated with an increased risk of later hospitalization for schizophrenia, adjusted HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.5-1.32. CONCLUSIONS: Overall there was no significant association between childhood CNS infection and schizophrenia. These data do not support the presence of an infectious etiology of schizophrenia. SN - 1573-2509 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20846826/CNS_infection_in_childhood_does_not_confer_risk_for_later_schizophrenia:_a_case_control_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0920-9964(10)01496-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -