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DASH-style diet and 24-hour urine composition.
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 2010; 5(12):2315-22CJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

We previously observed associations between a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style diet and large reductions in kidney stone risk. This study examined associations between a DASH-style diet and 24-hour excretions of urinary lithogenic factors.

DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS

We studied 3426 participants with and without nephrolithiasis in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) and the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS) I and II. A dietary DASH score was based on seven components: high intake of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes, dairy products, and whole grains and low intake of sweetened beverages and red and processed meats. We used analysis of covariance to adjust for age, stone history, body size, and other factors.

RESULTS

Comparing participants in the highest to lowest quintiles of DASH score, multivariate-adjusted urinary calcium excretion was 3% greater in HPFS (P trend 0.12), 10% greater in NHS I (P trend <0.01), and 12% greater in NHS II (P trend 0.05). Urinary oxalate was 4% to 18% greater (P trend all ≤0.03), urinary citrate was 11% to 16% greater (P trend all <0.01), and urinary volume was 16% to 32% greater (P trend all <0.001). Higher DASH score was associated with higher urine potassium, magnesium, phosphate, and pH, and lower relative supersaturations (RSS) of calcium oxalate (women only) and uric acid.

CONCLUSIONS

A DASH-style diet may reduce stone risk by increasing urinary citrate and volume. The small associations between higher DASH score and lower RSS suggest unidentified stone inhibitors in dairy products and/or plants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. entaylor@partners.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20847091

Citation

Taylor, Eric N., et al. "DASH-style Diet and 24-hour Urine Composition." Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN, vol. 5, no. 12, 2010, pp. 2315-22.
Taylor EN, Stampfer MJ, Mount DB, et al. DASH-style diet and 24-hour urine composition. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010;5(12):2315-22.
Taylor, E. N., Stampfer, M. J., Mount, D. B., & Curhan, G. C. (2010). DASH-style diet and 24-hour urine composition. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN, 5(12), pp. 2315-22. doi:10.2215/CJN.04420510.
Taylor EN, et al. DASH-style Diet and 24-hour Urine Composition. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010;5(12):2315-22. PubMed PMID: 20847091.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - DASH-style diet and 24-hour urine composition. AU - Taylor,Eric N, AU - Stampfer,Meir J, AU - Mount,David B, AU - Curhan,Gary C, Y1 - 2010/09/16/ PY - 2010/9/18/entrez PY - 2010/9/18/pubmed PY - 2011/4/13/medline SP - 2315 EP - 22 JF - Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN JO - Clin J Am Soc Nephrol VL - 5 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: We previously observed associations between a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style diet and large reductions in kidney stone risk. This study examined associations between a DASH-style diet and 24-hour excretions of urinary lithogenic factors. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: We studied 3426 participants with and without nephrolithiasis in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) and the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS) I and II. A dietary DASH score was based on seven components: high intake of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes, dairy products, and whole grains and low intake of sweetened beverages and red and processed meats. We used analysis of covariance to adjust for age, stone history, body size, and other factors. RESULTS: Comparing participants in the highest to lowest quintiles of DASH score, multivariate-adjusted urinary calcium excretion was 3% greater in HPFS (P trend 0.12), 10% greater in NHS I (P trend <0.01), and 12% greater in NHS II (P trend 0.05). Urinary oxalate was 4% to 18% greater (P trend all ≤0.03), urinary citrate was 11% to 16% greater (P trend all <0.01), and urinary volume was 16% to 32% greater (P trend all <0.001). Higher DASH score was associated with higher urine potassium, magnesium, phosphate, and pH, and lower relative supersaturations (RSS) of calcium oxalate (women only) and uric acid. CONCLUSIONS: A DASH-style diet may reduce stone risk by increasing urinary citrate and volume. The small associations between higher DASH score and lower RSS suggest unidentified stone inhibitors in dairy products and/or plants. SN - 1555-905X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20847091/DASH_style_diet_and_24_hour_urine_composition_ L2 - http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=20847091 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -