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Perceptions of veterinary faculty members regarding their responsibility and preparation to teach non-technical competencies.
J Vet Med Educ. 2010 Fall; 37(3):238-47.JV

Abstract

The development of non-technical competencies has become an important component of veterinary education. In this study, we determined faculty perspectives regarding their perceived involvement and ability in the cultivation of these competencies. A survey was administered to faculty members at five institutions. Respondents were asked whether the competency should be taught in their own courses and how prepared they felt to teach and evaluate the competency. Responses were analyzed by participant institution, gender, terminal degree and year, discipline, rank, and teaching experience. More than 90% of faculty respondents reported a personal responsibility to teach or cultivate critical thinking skills, communication skills, self-development skills, and ethical skills, with more than 85% also agreeing to a role in skills such as interpersonal skills, creativity, and self-management. The lowest percentages were seen for crisis and incident management (64%) and business skills (56%). Perceived preparedness to teach and evaluate these competencies paralleled the preceding findings, especially for the four consensus competencies and self-management. Faculty preparedness was lowest for business skills. Junior faculty were somewhat less likely than others to perceive a responsibility to teach non-technical competencies; however, instructors were more prepared to teach and evaluate business skills than were other faculty. Institutional trends were evident in faculty preparation. Although male faculty and non-DVM faculty tended to report a higher degree of preparedness, few differences reached statistical significance. Faculty perceptions of their responsibility to teach non-technical competencies vary by competency and parallel their perceived preparedness to teach and evaluate them.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine, Knoxville, TN 37996-4544, USA. ilane@utk.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20847332

Citation

Lane, India F., and E Grady Bogue. "Perceptions of Veterinary Faculty Members Regarding Their Responsibility and Preparation to Teach Non-technical Competencies." Journal of Veterinary Medical Education, vol. 37, no. 3, 2010, pp. 238-47.
Lane IF, Bogue EG. Perceptions of veterinary faculty members regarding their responsibility and preparation to teach non-technical competencies. J Vet Med Educ. 2010;37(3):238-47.
Lane, I. F., & Bogue, E. G. (2010). Perceptions of veterinary faculty members regarding their responsibility and preparation to teach non-technical competencies. Journal of Veterinary Medical Education, 37(3), 238-47. https://doi.org/10.3138/jvme.37.3.238
Lane IF, Bogue EG. Perceptions of Veterinary Faculty Members Regarding Their Responsibility and Preparation to Teach Non-technical Competencies. J Vet Med Educ. 2010;37(3):238-47. PubMed PMID: 20847332.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Perceptions of veterinary faculty members regarding their responsibility and preparation to teach non-technical competencies. AU - Lane,India F, AU - Bogue,E Grady, PY - 2010/9/18/entrez PY - 2010/9/18/pubmed PY - 2011/2/9/medline SP - 238 EP - 47 JF - Journal of veterinary medical education JO - J Vet Med Educ VL - 37 IS - 3 N2 - The development of non-technical competencies has become an important component of veterinary education. In this study, we determined faculty perspectives regarding their perceived involvement and ability in the cultivation of these competencies. A survey was administered to faculty members at five institutions. Respondents were asked whether the competency should be taught in their own courses and how prepared they felt to teach and evaluate the competency. Responses were analyzed by participant institution, gender, terminal degree and year, discipline, rank, and teaching experience. More than 90% of faculty respondents reported a personal responsibility to teach or cultivate critical thinking skills, communication skills, self-development skills, and ethical skills, with more than 85% also agreeing to a role in skills such as interpersonal skills, creativity, and self-management. The lowest percentages were seen for crisis and incident management (64%) and business skills (56%). Perceived preparedness to teach and evaluate these competencies paralleled the preceding findings, especially for the four consensus competencies and self-management. Faculty preparedness was lowest for business skills. Junior faculty were somewhat less likely than others to perceive a responsibility to teach non-technical competencies; however, instructors were more prepared to teach and evaluate business skills than were other faculty. Institutional trends were evident in faculty preparation. Although male faculty and non-DVM faculty tended to report a higher degree of preparedness, few differences reached statistical significance. Faculty perceptions of their responsibility to teach non-technical competencies vary by competency and parallel their perceived preparedness to teach and evaluate them. SN - 0748-321X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20847332/Perceptions_of_veterinary_faculty_members_regarding_their_responsibility_and_preparation_to_teach_non_technical_competencies_ L2 - https://jvme.utpjournals.press/doi/10.3138/jvme.37.3.238?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -