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Vaccine preventable diseases in returned international travelers: results from the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network.
Vaccine. 2010 Oct 28; 28(46):7389-95.V

Abstract

Vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs) threaten international travelers, but little is known about their epidemiology in this group. We analyzed records of 37,542 ill returned travelers entered into the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network database. Among 580 (1.5%) with VPDs, common diagnoses included enteric fever (n=276), acute viral hepatitis (n=148), and influenza (n=70). Factors associated with S. typhi included VFR travel (p<0.016) to South Central Asia (p<0.001). Business travel was associated with influenza (p<0.001), and longer travel with hepatitis A virus (p=0.02). 29% of those with VPDs had pre-travel consultations. At least 55% of those with VPDs were managed as inpatients, compared to 9.5% of those with non-VPDs. Three deaths occurred; one each due to pneumococcal meningitis, S. typhi, and rabies. VPDs are significant contributors to morbidity and potential mortality in travelers. High rates of hospitalization make them an attractive target for pre-travel intervention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Tropical Disease Unit, UHN-Toronto General Hospital, 200 Elizabeth Street, North Wing, Toronto, ON, M5G 2C4, Canada. andrea.boggild@utoronto.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20851081

Citation

Boggild, Andrea K., et al. "Vaccine Preventable Diseases in Returned International Travelers: Results From the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network." Vaccine, vol. 28, no. 46, 2010, pp. 7389-95.
Boggild AK, Castelli F, Gautret P, et al. Vaccine preventable diseases in returned international travelers: results from the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network. Vaccine. 2010;28(46):7389-95.
Boggild, A. K., Castelli, F., Gautret, P., Torresi, J., von Sonnenburg, F., Barnett, E. D., Greenaway, C. A., Lim, P. L., Schwartz, E., Wilder-Smith, A., & Wilson, M. E. (2010). Vaccine preventable diseases in returned international travelers: results from the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network. Vaccine, 28(46), 7389-95. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2010.09.009
Boggild AK, et al. Vaccine Preventable Diseases in Returned International Travelers: Results From the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network. Vaccine. 2010 Oct 28;28(46):7389-95. PubMed PMID: 20851081.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vaccine preventable diseases in returned international travelers: results from the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network. AU - Boggild,Andrea K, AU - Castelli,Francesco, AU - Gautret,Philippe, AU - Torresi,Joseph, AU - von Sonnenburg,Frank, AU - Barnett,Elizabeth D, AU - Greenaway,Christina A, AU - Lim,Poh-Lian, AU - Schwartz,Eli, AU - Wilder-Smith,Annelies, AU - Wilson,Mary E, AU - ,, Y1 - 2010/09/17/ PY - 2010/01/26/received PY - 2010/09/01/revised PY - 2010/09/02/accepted PY - 2010/9/21/entrez PY - 2010/9/21/pubmed PY - 2011/1/22/medline SP - 7389 EP - 95 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 28 IS - 46 N2 - Vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs) threaten international travelers, but little is known about their epidemiology in this group. We analyzed records of 37,542 ill returned travelers entered into the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network database. Among 580 (1.5%) with VPDs, common diagnoses included enteric fever (n=276), acute viral hepatitis (n=148), and influenza (n=70). Factors associated with S. typhi included VFR travel (p<0.016) to South Central Asia (p<0.001). Business travel was associated with influenza (p<0.001), and longer travel with hepatitis A virus (p=0.02). 29% of those with VPDs had pre-travel consultations. At least 55% of those with VPDs were managed as inpatients, compared to 9.5% of those with non-VPDs. Three deaths occurred; one each due to pneumococcal meningitis, S. typhi, and rabies. VPDs are significant contributors to morbidity and potential mortality in travelers. High rates of hospitalization make them an attractive target for pre-travel intervention. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20851081/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(10)01317-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -