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[Imported malaria in Bordeaux in 1989. Epidemiologic, clinical and therapeutic study of 71 cases].
Bull Soc Pathol Exot. 1990; 83(5):693-704.BS

Abstract

In 1989 there were 71 cases of imported malaria admitted to the hospital in Bordeaux. This is 16.5% and 29% lower than in 1988 and 1987 respectively, thanks to the widespread use in Africa of mefloquine chemoprophylaxis. Sub-Saharan Africa is involved in 95% of cases, mainly West Africa (70% of cases), unlike the situation in 1987, and the first cases of paludism despite mefloquine chemoprophylaxis appeared during the second semester from the seasonal mid-summer recrudescence onwards, in travellers returning from this region. The most frequent species is still Plasmodium falciparum (80% of declared cases). This imported disease especially affects young adults despite regular prophylaxis in 59% of cases. It is therefore important to recommend rigorous protection against anopheles. Male predominance (sex ratio: 5.5) was greater in 1989 than in the previous two years, and French nationals represented 85% of the population. Falciparum malaria presents symptoms in 95% of cases before the end of the month following the patient's return to France, while for P. ovale the time for symptoms to appear is between 39 days and two years after return. Management of patients on their return poses a problem of information, since in 40% of cases diagnosis is made more than a week after the first symptoms. Attacks are mild in most cases (93%); among the serious cases death occurred in a 3-year-old child. Thrombopenia is the most frequent biological sign (22.5% of cases), followed to a lesser degree by anaemia and leukopenia. Mild attacks respond well to classical treatment (halofantrine, mefloquine, quinine, chloroquine), while two cases of more complicated symptoms required exchange transfusion.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Université de Bordeaux 2, Santé-Voyages.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

fre

PubMed ID

2085918

Citation

Mazaudier, E, et al. "[Imported Malaria in Bordeaux in 1989. Epidemiologic, Clinical and Therapeutic Study of 71 Cases]." Bulletin De La Societe De Pathologie Exotique (1990), vol. 83, no. 5, 1990, pp. 693-704.
Mazaudier E, Raccurt CP, Schmitt A, et al. [Imported malaria in Bordeaux in 1989. Epidemiologic, clinical and therapeutic study of 71 cases]. Bull Soc Pathol Exot. 1990;83(5):693-704.
Mazaudier, E., Raccurt, C. P., Schmitt, A., Le Bras, M., & Ripert, C. (1990). [Imported malaria in Bordeaux in 1989. Epidemiologic, clinical and therapeutic study of 71 cases]. Bulletin De La Societe De Pathologie Exotique (1990), 83(5), 693-704.
Mazaudier E, et al. [Imported Malaria in Bordeaux in 1989. Epidemiologic, Clinical and Therapeutic Study of 71 Cases]. Bull Soc Pathol Exot. 1990;83(5):693-704. PubMed PMID: 2085918.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Imported malaria in Bordeaux in 1989. Epidemiologic, clinical and therapeutic study of 71 cases]. AU - Mazaudier,E, AU - Raccurt,C P, AU - Schmitt,A, AU - Le Bras,M, AU - Ripert,C, PY - 1990/1/1/pubmed PY - 1990/1/1/medline PY - 1990/1/1/entrez SP - 693 EP - 704 JF - Bulletin de la Societe de pathologie exotique (1990) JO - Bull Soc Pathol Exot VL - 83 IS - 5 N2 - In 1989 there were 71 cases of imported malaria admitted to the hospital in Bordeaux. This is 16.5% and 29% lower than in 1988 and 1987 respectively, thanks to the widespread use in Africa of mefloquine chemoprophylaxis. Sub-Saharan Africa is involved in 95% of cases, mainly West Africa (70% of cases), unlike the situation in 1987, and the first cases of paludism despite mefloquine chemoprophylaxis appeared during the second semester from the seasonal mid-summer recrudescence onwards, in travellers returning from this region. The most frequent species is still Plasmodium falciparum (80% of declared cases). This imported disease especially affects young adults despite regular prophylaxis in 59% of cases. It is therefore important to recommend rigorous protection against anopheles. Male predominance (sex ratio: 5.5) was greater in 1989 than in the previous two years, and French nationals represented 85% of the population. Falciparum malaria presents symptoms in 95% of cases before the end of the month following the patient's return to France, while for P. ovale the time for symptoms to appear is between 39 days and two years after return. Management of patients on their return poses a problem of information, since in 40% of cases diagnosis is made more than a week after the first symptoms. Attacks are mild in most cases (93%); among the serious cases death occurred in a 3-year-old child. Thrombopenia is the most frequent biological sign (22.5% of cases), followed to a lesser degree by anaemia and leukopenia. Mild attacks respond well to classical treatment (halofantrine, mefloquine, quinine, chloroquine), while two cases of more complicated symptoms required exchange transfusion. SN - 0037-9085 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2085918/[Imported_malaria_in_Bordeaux_in_1989__Epidemiologic_clinical_and_therapeutic_study_of_71_cases]_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/4415 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -