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Vitamins B(12), B(6), and folic acid for cognition in older men.
Neurology 2010; 75(17):1540-7Neur

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate whether supplementing older men with vitamins B(12), B(6), and folic acid improves cognitive function.

METHODS

The investigators recruited 299 community-representative hypertensive men 75 years and older to a randomized, double-blind controlled clinical trial of folic acid, vitamin B(6), and B(12) supplementation vs placebo over 2 years. The primary outcome of interest was the change in the cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-cog). A secondary aim of the study was to determine if supplementation with vitamins decreased the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia over 8 years.

RESULTS

The groups were well-balanced for demographic and biochemical parameters. There was no difference in the ADAS-cog change from baseline to 24 months between the placebo (0.8, SD 4.0) and vitamins group (0.7, SD 3.4). The adjusted scores in the treatment groups did not differ over time (placebo 0.2 lower, z = 0.71, p = 0.478). There was a nonsignificant 28% decrease in the risk of cognitive impairment (odds ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.25-2.09) and dementia (hazard ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.29-1.78) over 8 years of follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS

The daily supplementation of vitamins B(12), B(6), and folic acid does not benefit cognitive function in older men, nor does it reduce the risk of cognitive impairment or dementia.

CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE

This study provides Class I evidence that vitamin supplementation with daily doses of 500 μg [DOSAGE ERROR CORRECTED] of B(12), 2 mg of folic acid, and 25 mg of B(6) over 2 years does not improve cognitive function in hypertensive men aged 75 and older.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Medical Research & School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, WA Centre for Health & Ageing, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia. andrew.ford@uwa.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20861451

Citation

Ford, A H., et al. "Vitamins B(12), B(6), and Folic Acid for Cognition in Older Men." Neurology, vol. 75, no. 17, 2010, pp. 1540-7.
Ford AH, Flicker L, Alfonso H, et al. Vitamins B(12), B(6), and folic acid for cognition in older men. Neurology. 2010;75(17):1540-7.
Ford, A. H., Flicker, L., Alfonso, H., Thomas, J., Clarnette, R., Martins, R., & Almeida, O. P. (2010). Vitamins B(12), B(6), and folic acid for cognition in older men. Neurology, 75(17), pp. 1540-7. doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181f962c4.
Ford AH, et al. Vitamins B(12), B(6), and Folic Acid for Cognition in Older Men. Neurology. 2010 Oct 26;75(17):1540-7. PubMed PMID: 20861451.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamins B(12), B(6), and folic acid for cognition in older men. AU - Ford,A H, AU - Flicker,L, AU - Alfonso,H, AU - Thomas,J, AU - Clarnette,R, AU - Martins,R, AU - Almeida,O P, Y1 - 2010/09/22/ PY - 2010/9/24/entrez PY - 2010/9/24/pubmed PY - 2010/11/13/medline SP - 1540 EP - 7 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 75 IS - 17 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether supplementing older men with vitamins B(12), B(6), and folic acid improves cognitive function. METHODS: The investigators recruited 299 community-representative hypertensive men 75 years and older to a randomized, double-blind controlled clinical trial of folic acid, vitamin B(6), and B(12) supplementation vs placebo over 2 years. The primary outcome of interest was the change in the cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-cog). A secondary aim of the study was to determine if supplementation with vitamins decreased the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia over 8 years. RESULTS: The groups were well-balanced for demographic and biochemical parameters. There was no difference in the ADAS-cog change from baseline to 24 months between the placebo (0.8, SD 4.0) and vitamins group (0.7, SD 3.4). The adjusted scores in the treatment groups did not differ over time (placebo 0.2 lower, z = 0.71, p = 0.478). There was a nonsignificant 28% decrease in the risk of cognitive impairment (odds ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.25-2.09) and dementia (hazard ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.29-1.78) over 8 years of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The daily supplementation of vitamins B(12), B(6), and folic acid does not benefit cognitive function in older men, nor does it reduce the risk of cognitive impairment or dementia. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class I evidence that vitamin supplementation with daily doses of 500 μg [DOSAGE ERROR CORRECTED] of B(12), 2 mg of folic acid, and 25 mg of B(6) over 2 years does not improve cognitive function in hypertensive men aged 75 and older. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20861451/Vitamins_B_12__B_6__and_folic_acid_for_cognition_in_older_men_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=20861451 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -